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Bridge Winners Profile for Debbie Rosenberg

Debbie Rosenberg
Debbie Rosenberg
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Basic Information

Member Since
Oct. 9, 2010
Last Seen
12 seconds ago
Member Type
Bridge Player
about me

It's hard for me to believe, but I've been a professional bridge player and teacher for about 30 years. Along with Michael Rosenberg, our then 14-year-old son Kevin, and my mom, Judy Zuckerberg, in 2011 I moved from NY to the Bay Area of California. When not teaching bridge, I'm often enjoying hiking with new friends in this beautiful weather, while Michael stays home to write comments on Bridge Winners articles.

While I've always enjoyed seeing young people learn bridge, in 2013 youth bridge become my passion.  That year I became a mentor and organizer in the USBF Junior training program, and co-founded a youth bridge organization in the Bay Area, Silicon Valley Youth Bridge.

Country
United States of America

Bridge Information

Favorite Bridge Memory
Kevin at 9 playing duplicate with his great-grandmother, my Grandma Leah. Any memory of discussing or playing bridge with Rev Murthy
Bridge Accomplishments
World Junior Team Champion 1991; Cavendish Teams 1st place 1993; World Women's Pairs 1st 2002; Venice Cup 1st place 2007; Reisinger 3rd 2008; IBPA awards for Best Bid hand of the year with JoAnna Stansby in both 2006 and 2010 ; IBPA Sportmanship Award in 2012; Grand National Teams 2nd 2016; 1st 2017. Teaching some of my students to COUNT
Member of Bridge Club(s)
Palo Alto Bridge Center in Mountain View, California (ACBL Unit 503); Founder, Silicon Valley Youth Bridge
Favorite Conventions
Splinters, because they allow you to play the hand in the bidding
BBO Username
debrose
ACBL Ranking
Grand Life Master
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An Absurd ACBL Procedure
Yes, please do so - either you or Danny, or both! Thank you.
Insufficient Bid
The handful of times I've seen it come up at the table have certainly convinced me that this isn't the case.
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
Jeff, I agree that there are simpler, better ways to handle this. At the risk of causing you to regret commenting here, I'd like to ask you a question in your role as a member of the ACBL Competitions and Conventions committee. How should those of us who care ...
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
People find a way to get the boards and start. I assure you it happens all the time. I don't play as many regionals as some others do, but I play enough to know this is true. I'm sure others can confirm.
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
Seriously, the sensible thing is to ask the N-S pair you just finished playing against to: A) Bring the completed boards to our teammates B) While you are there, please pick up the boards they are finished with, so we can start against the third team. It's also sensible ...
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
In practice that is not true. A table often starts the second half of the round robin, somehow getting boards from the table still playing. Perhaps they bribe a caddy to bring them.
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
Thanks, Ping. I agree that only a small change is needed, however, I don't think this suggestion is practical. Fairly often the table E-W is moving to is ready, and they start playing (mysteriously obtaining some boards from the third table without E-W, who are still playing, bringing them ...
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
Thanks, Nic. It's a fair point that many of us on here, sometimes myself included, tend to focus on the top bracket(s) of team events, and are less sensitive to what works best for the lower brackets and the directors trying to manage them all at once. Still ...
An Absurd ACBL Procedure
In a Swiss, there is presumably only one round robin for the director to deal with. In a KO, there are often multiple round robins, and I can buy that it would be difficult for the directors to move all those boards. I also (somewhat) buy how it could be ...
Insufficient Bid
I couldn't agree with Kit more that this really is a bad concept. I'd like to add that bids (or doubles) don't have inherent meanings. Pairs make agreements to artificially define bids and doubles, and then they regularly forget those agreements, when not first reminded by an ...
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