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All comments by Rosalind Hengeveld
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I play something similar: (1)-2 or (1)-2 shows five or more hearts and four or more spades (not 54). We do not call it by any name.
July 14
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And then there was Eric Murray (1928 – 19 May 2018), whose contributions in a bidding poll would read “3NT. Game try.” and “6NT. Slam try.”
July 13
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Yes, Lavinthal is a preference rather than a command; the American term ‘suit preference’ fits the bill.
July 11
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5, assuming 4 is Leaping Michaels (else 5)
July 10
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Plus the two aces and no queens.
July 10
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You must mean: five of the major asks for a control – not a stopper, such as QJx – in the unbid suit.
July 10
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Suit preference is known as ‘Lavinthal’ in Europe, or at least in some countries.
July 9
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Two and a half quick tricks plus a five-card spade suit is not ‘crap’. But of course, if a pair opens light, they must use heavier game and slam tries.
July 9
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Multi usually includes a stronger notrump that that, at least 21–22 (which occurs about half as often as 20–21), as I play 24+.
July 9
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Yes, if only for simplicity's sake, I play system on over any artificial bid doubled. Therefore, at worst we have to agree on pass and redouble.
July 9
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No (not as I play), and that is because Multi 2 (usually) contains one or more strong options, which would be shown by bids of 2NT and up.
July 8
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Sensible opponents will usually play double of 2 for take-out, often a balanced hand worth a minimum opening bid, suits bids to be natural, and 2NT strong. The simplest defense after double is that pass is (a proposal) to play, all suit bids retain their meaning, and redouble is your pick, possibly business.

After an overcall of 2/, double is ‘negative’, i.e., wants to contest the partscore or better, unless of course partner has their long suit coinciding with opponent's (which does happen, believe it or not). After higher overcalls, double is penalties, 3/ is pass-or-correct.
July 8
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The only time Kickback is not superior (nor inferior) is when spades are trumps.
July 8
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2NT as ‘natural game-forcing’ works primarily auto-preemptive. (I played it for a while, long time ago.)
July 8
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I personally hate T for 10.
July 5
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© 1 unless that shows four, I presume. :)
July 5
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Playing North's double as ‘lead directing showing good diamonds’ does not make sense. This double is generally played as take-out, often a minimum balanced hand or any strong hand; it says nothing about diamonds.
July 3
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The original Bergen raises (from Bergen's book, see above) are, over 1/:

1NT includes 5–7 or 11–12 with three-card support
2/ 8–10 (or 9 losers) with three-card support
2NT Jacoby, game-forcing with support
3 6–9 (or 9 losers) with four-card support
3 10–11 (or 8 losers) with four-card support
1-3, 1-3 any splinter
3NT 13–15 usually 4333 with three-card support, passable
4 16+ balanced with support
4 ‘good’ preemptive raise to four
4/ weak preemptive
1-4, 1-4 to play
July 3
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Most people who state playing ‘Bergen Raises’ play just the 3/ responses as Mixed Raise and Limit Raise with four+ card support. However, Bergen Raises as advocated by Marty Bergen (see reference above under Michael Hargreaves' contribution) encompasses all bids of 2NT through 4 as raises and includes 4/ as described in the original post.

Next to 3/, the only part of original Bergen Raises that I play is the ‘Bergen 3NT’: around 13–15 HCP and usually 4333, passable.
July 3
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That very idea is in fact part of the original complete Bergen Raises (Bergen, Marty, ‘Better Bidding with Bergen, Volume I – Uncontested Auctions’, Max Hardy, 1985, ISBN 0-939460-32-7, pages 37–43).
July 3
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