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All comments by Richard Granville
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Yes - this is a useful extension to the simple “systems on” and more practical than what I referenced below.
Oct. 14
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I play systems on, including a transfer to opener's suit: it can sometimes be right to play there.

But after a 1M opening it's theoretically better to play something along the lines of what David Gold summarized in a comment on http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/what-does-3h-mean-here/

In practice the gains after a 1NT overcall are much less than after a 2NT overcall, so I haven't got around to working out the details.
Oct. 14
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I realize that this pragmatic style isn't for everyone, but it's strongly favoured by David Burn. We always treat 4-4-3-2 and 5-3-3-2 hands as balanced, regardless of suitability.
Oct. 11
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1 shows an unbalanced hand. With 12-14 balanced I rebid 1NT and with 18-19 (playing 2/1) I rebid 2NT. 1 isn't forcing in 2/1 (although it is in MOSSO).
Oct. 11
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I strongly favour option (b). After 1-1 I would rebid 1NT with KQJx KJx xx Axxx without thinking about it. If partner passes and 1NT isn't the right contract then that's just too bad. It's much more important for opener to indicate the general nature of his hand. Two Way Checkback will resolve most issues if responder is strong enough to rebid.

This is my philosophy in both 2/1 and MOSSO.
Oct. 7
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Or in my case 2 showing either clubs or an invitation to 3NT.
Oct. 6
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Partner didn't make a lead-directing double of 2, but he could still have four good clubs or five moderate ones.
Sept. 27
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While I'm strongly in favour of an approach similar to David Gold's after (2M) 2NT, I regard “systems on” after (2) 2NT as perfectly adequate.
Sept. 22
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I think that Gene was answering according to his own system. I would make the same bid myself.
Sept. 17
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2 is right - you won't miss game if partner passes. Jumping to 3 could come unstuck if partner is strong and off-shape.
Sept. 16
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That's what most people seem to do, but it's incredibly inefficient.
Sept. 16
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Nowadays over a Precision-style 2 I use a 2NT response to show an invitational plus hand with diamonds.

In my younger days (playing Precision) I played 2NT as a Puppet to 3, which could be followed by 3 to show a GF hand with diamonds.
Sept. 16
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Against a weak 2M I play what David Gold summarized in a comment on http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/what-does-3h-mean-here/

Against a weak 2D I play the normal 2NT system.
Sept. 16
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Or clubs.
Sept. 16
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Where are the hearts? Doubler won't have five and advancer probably won't have four, thus partner presumably partner has four. He will also have six clubs, so is almost certainly short in spades.
Sept. 13
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I know of some strong pairs that play this, but I can't really recommend it. You've highlighted the main disadvantages. As for your claimed advantages, responding a semi-forcing 1NT with a limit raise rarely causes a problem - you might sometimes play in 1NT rather than 3M, but this may be a better contract anyway.

If you want to develop your bidding after 1M-2, have a look at https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/spear-them/.
Sept. 9
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I used to belong to a Mah-Jong group and one of its members recently took up bridge. I noticed a copy of Kantar's “Bridge for Dummies” on her bookshelf and had a quick look while I was sitting out. I was impressed with the careful explanations and sufficiently slow pace of the book.

But I agree whole-heartedly with your second sentence. In practice some learners find playing too daunting at an early stage and could benefit from an online facility. The “no fear bridge” websites provide useful support to beginners, improvers and stronger players, with the .com site using a simple SAYC approach.
Sept. 9
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Yes - it works reasonably well most of the time.
Sept. 8
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My style after 1m-1M is:
(1) a raise shows either 4 card support or a side singleton (probably 1=3=5=4 after a 1 opening);

(2) a 1NT rebid denies a singleton in responder's suit.


So I just rebid 1NT here, expecting partner to remove if he has 5 hearts and an unbalanced hand. Why can't partner have a hand like KJTx 9xxx xxx Kx?
Sept. 6
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In a recent match my partner was faced with a similar problem: what to open at game all with - T9832 KQT9876 6. He opted for 3, which I converted to 3NT for a fairly comfortable nine tricks. The strong player at the other table was somewhat less successful with his choice of 4 - his partner raised to 5, which went three down.
Sept. 6
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