Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Randy Thompson
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The problem is that 4 will sound to partner like a hand that has one more heart and one fewer black cards and really likes hearts for slam! I don't agree with point (1) of your three points – this sounds like a cue for hearts not a don't-like-eitherl-major cue bid.
April 7, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Responder holds SIX+ while partner holds ZERO+. It doesn't matter what the no trump range is, 10-12, 12-14 whatever. Either way, if responder is weak he will NOT pass 1N if he has been playing weak no trumps for more than a month or two. Take it to the bank. Responder will have 7-12 HCP if their range is 10-12, so that will leave partner's MAX at 7 HCP if we have 17. 0-7 tends to be 3 or 4, which makes this a jump ball hand where 1N is much easier to make than defend. If you don't play the weak or mini no trumps then maybe you dream of responder having 0 but that will NOT be the case against any experienced pair using this range.
April 7, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I bid 1N, but it was close between that and pass. I lacked the imagination to bid 1, but might have bid it had it occurred to me. 1 would be my last choice – that's the one bid most likely to overexcite partner. That can result in a violation of the Law of Total Trumps (never name a suit trumps where the opponents hold more of it than we do). One meta-agreement of my partnerships is to never bid a 3 card major in response to a take-out double. When RHO passed the double, and we are broke, major suit bids tend to get us way too high – and in the wrong strain. Pards tend to hope we have 5 spades if we bid 1 here.
April 7, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We can hold up in clubs. We should have some fast tricks, or clubs can split, or maybe it's diamonds that worry pard, so 3N should make. If my majors were reversed, I'd bid 3 but I don't want to encourage a 5-2 spade fit with deuce-deuce in spades. Still, if pard is 6-5 or 6-6 or 5-6 we belong in the major (in hearts on all but the 6-5). Good problem.
April 7, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I define that balancing double as a DONT double because doubling in pass out seat vs weak no trump with a flat hand of any strength is a serious mistake. Any artificial meaning that makes partner pass when balanced is okay by me.

I'd like the opinion of those who PLAY weak no trumps on this issue: Would you EVER pass 1N when your side has no chance to hold 19 points? Of course you wouldn't! For those who don't play weak no trumps, here's a challenge for you: watch what responder has for his pass of a weak NT (say 12-14) and it will fit this description: 6-10 HCP and no 5 cd major. This is why the single most important agreement you can have in your defense of 1N is that doubles of Stayman and Jacoby should show big flat hands. When responder RUNS is when you may have the weak no trumpers in big trouble; when they sit, just subtract your points from 20 in balancing seat and you'll know pard's most likely holding.

In the midst of a bad drubbing in a KO match at Dallas, one board that brought us back some was when our 12-14 1N was doubled in pass-out seat. I redoubled with my 14 count and made only one overtrick for some number ending in 60. I think our pass should be alertable but several national directors told us that it was NOT avertable (negative inference). But now you know – weak no trumpers are NOT hurting when it is your turn in 4th seat and you have a flat hand. If you double, YOU could be hurting, because opener knows responder has some values and responder knows he has them as well! There won't be any escape meanings for redouble here – that redouble means blood is on the table and all doubles are now penalty doubles if the partner of the fool who doubled runs or the fool himself runs.
April 7, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If your partners hold lots of cards, maybe 1 would be best (and that is surely best in a bidding contest where the opponents can be ignored and you know pard has some cards). But for those of us whose partners are bad card holders, 2 stands out at the table. It is a PLUS to have 4 spades on the side, as lack of spades will make it much harder for either opponent to double. Would I prefer better hearts? Sure, but this is all we were dealt so they'll have to do. I wouldn't mind whether my partner chose 1 or 2 on this hand, but if he passed it, we'd have a long discussion after the game, as that is a losing style.
April 6, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
He who knows goes – and we know. Why torture partner (who is likely wide open in one or both black suits) with a 4 cue? 4 set trumps for slam, so unfortunately this won't be RKC for hearts but if we bid 5N over a 5 response he'll get us to 7 in a hurry if he has the K.
April 3, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I would bid 2 if “constructive but not forcing.” I would bid 1N if I had a diamond stopper. I would bid 2 transfer then 2 if playing that. I think that about all we have left is 2, which at least in my preferred “constructive raise if they pass our overcall” structure would at show 8-11.
March 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Another way of saying it is that “you can't unring a bell!” Once you ring the minimum hand with long clubs bell, nothing will EVER get you caught up to the 8 tops plus another suit stopped that you hold. 3N shows this hand except that the Ax is normally in spades and the void in hearts, but at least pard will hear the “8 tricks” bell rung. Second choice is 3C, but I'm not sure that quite tells this story when it comes to playing tricks and tells a tad more than you have when it comes to HCP.
March 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'm with you John! I voted for 3N, the bid I would always make at the table. If partner couldn't stop spades, someone would have bid them by now. Good partners have the AS and KH and a non-void in clubs.
March 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think 2N is more respectful to partner and the opponents than a direct 3N or a double followed by 3N. If partner has an opening hand, we'll reach game; if not, 2N should let us find our best part score.
March 19, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When partner didn't bid no trump at his first or second turn to bid, YES I would give up on NT. This is IMPs, not match points. The time to bid 4 was burned with first a 3 re-cue (ugggggh!) and then with a 3 bid that would suggest heart help for NT or a 4 card suit (uggggh!). At this point, just prepare your apologies for pard for having committed the 3 and 3 bids and risk playing your slam in game rather than your game in slam – bid 5.
March 17, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Inverted raises work well in weak NT auctions – perhaps because they were invented as part of K-S. I don't play inverted raises in my 2/1 partnership (because we don't play often enough to warrant all the work you need to do to get it straight when opener might have a flat 12).

In a weak NT context, an inverted minor suit raise should show at least a hand strong enough to force game over a 15-17 NT (preemptive 3m raises would not have invited game opposite a big NT and with invite hands responder must bid 1N, which opener only raises with a Big NT hand if he has a hand that would have cheerfully accepted an invite). Therefore, a 2N rebid by opener (showing 15-17) is forcing to game (leaving room to check for open suits with natural bids at the three level). 3N rebids by opener show 18-19 flat. Distinguishing between the two flat ranges is important for slam bidding when responder has extras and having 3N be the stronger bid makes having an open suit much less likely. Neither flat-hand rebid guarantees all unbid suits stopped.

Rebids of a new suit by opener below the level of 3m are natural, deny a flat hand and neither show nor deny extras. Rebids of 3m by opener definitely deny extras and are not forcing. 3m rebids bids nearly always should have a sixth card in m, however (only exception might be refusing to bid a deuce-fourth new suit).

After making an inverted raise, responder can rebid 2N (not forcing) over 2M by opener to show 10-11 flat and the unbid suits stopped. 3m by responder is also not forcing and might be distributional or flat with an open suit. Opener can then bid a 3 card fragment over 3m to force to at least 3N.

1m-2m denies a 4-card major.
1m-2m forces to 2N by responder or 3m by either.
Bids above 3m by either partner force game.
Bids below 3N by either partner relate to playing 3N.
Bids above 3N by either partner relate to finding slam in m and are forcing to 5m.
March 14, 2014
Randy Thompson edited this comment March 14, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Is it too late to abstain? The issue should have been simple – how high in clubs. Partner is a passed hand and yes, we MIGHT have a slam, but playing in 4 would . . . well, zero tolerance precludes me from saying what I think of pass. Re-Cue auctions are seldom anything but blame transfer auctions. This auction has officially derailed – I quit in game, 5, the one that will make, not 4, the one that will go down in flames, likely on a 3-3 fit.
March 14, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Undiscussed, and without specific agreement to the contrary, double is surely penalty. Yes, I am old. And yes, I would be damned glad to be playing penalty doubles on this hand! My usual meta-agreement is that doubles above the level of 2 of partner's suit are not support and whether they are penalty or DSI depends on where you sit in connection to the bid (behind it double is penalty, in front of it DSI). Here, if we pass, partner's double would be DSI. This may not be best, but it seems to come in handy over frisky preemptors.
March 11, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I voted for 3N but on reflection I think the 3 bidders made a better bid than I and the 4 bidders made a MUCH better bid than I. One bid I would never make with this massive hand is a non-forcing 3. Because 4 goes beyond 3N maybe it should imply diamond support and a hand such as this one that can underwrite 5m but still isn't sure which m. Hard to imagine it as non-forcing when 3 was available for that sort of hand.
March 11, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Tom:

3N certainly could be right – if you can get to the hearts after they are ready to run. With 6 hearts and a fit for your diamonds, pard might not have all that much outside. To use your J in no trump, you will need two side entries; in trumps you can just float that jack and ruff something to get there to draw more trumps.

I view this as similar to a Jacoby transfer followed by a raise of 2M to 3M – Partner seldom is interested in hearing 3N from you on that auction. That said, he still has a turn to bid and gets to share the blame if he guesses wrong.

In saying there was no alternative to completing the relay, perhaps I'm just reading too much into this based on instincts from where opener's rebid was 1N not 1. I'm new to XYZ in a situation where opener's rebid didn't limit his hand. Maybe it DID limit it by being willing to let responder stop in 2, as pointed out by John Adams. But, as 1 wasn't forcing, there was already a limit to how strong opener can be and surely it would take a heart fit and a very heavy 1 rebid to overrule the relay and not let partner describe his hand. If our partnership style would be to skip spades and rebid 1N or 2N on all flat hands, then my 1 rebid showed a short suit somewhere (surely hearts about 90% of the time). Yet partner invited in hearts, not no trump. He could have Ax QTxxxxx Qxx x or the like, where his shortness is in the unbid club suit.

March 10, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This is simple. You had NO discretion about bidding 2 – none at all. Bidding anything other than 2 would be presumptuous and a violation of system. Partner MIGHT just be getting out in diamonds! 3 is invitational with SIX hearts and 2 is invitational with FIVE hearts (or six very, very bad ones where pard wants 3-card support to go on). This isn't a situation where you do anything other than decide whether to bid 4 or pass –regardless of your superior judgment. Just do what pard asked and decide. I'd bid 4.
March 10, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If you are going to bid with partner's hand, might as well double and not lose the spade suit. Passing with this hand is at least as risky as double, but passers seldom acknowledge the risks of their inaction. 7-loser hand with 2 QT and 12 in support of spades or diamonds. Seems like a double to me, assuming we are playing equal-level conversion. (My partnerships take out take-out doubles, but if partner decides to leave it in, he won't count on me for more defense than this.) IMO, it's better to double and then drag your feet than to pass and try to catch up later. If it goes 1H-p-3 *-P, P-?? (*preemptive) back to me will I be “safer” doubling now or must I defend 3?
March 9, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Congrats to two clear-cut inductees.
March 8, 2014
.

Bottom Home Top