Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Randy Thompson
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think the auction was fine. I usually don't do well at matchpoints. :)
Sept. 29, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Can you say “Asbergers” boys and girls? I knew you could. This is all the DP drama I can stand and I won't miss him for even a nanosecond.
Sept. 27, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Bozos. IMO, to say that the Michaels bidder hasn't bid hearts is just gibberish. We bid their only known suit (this was Guessing Michaels, after all) and that could be anything but a cue bid? Bozos. If we had transferred to hearts would that also not be “bidding them?” If we have shown a suit by doubling their Jacoby transfer have we not “bid” it?
Sept. 27, 2014
Randy Thompson edited this comment Sept. 27, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
1N shows our values and that some of them are in diamonds. If the auction dies there, we won't be missing 4. If it does not die there, then bidding 2 later will be an option that could let partner know exactly what this hand looks like. Making a 1 bid that has a bottom end of zero seems to risk missing a game. While my first inclination was 2, that is a very weak suit if partner has say 3-4-2-4 shape.
Sept. 25, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks, Peter. Now I don't feel nearly as guilty about my 2N bid. You were always our go-to consultant when we lived in the Washington area and had a bidding judgment question.
Sept. 24, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
To get that vul game bonus, don't you have to take 9 tricks before they take 5? If partner has good diamonds AND an entry to them, that entry won't be in clubs and on the bidding won't be in spades. So on this bidding, whatever might they lead? Your 4-solid clubs? nah. The suits you and partner bid? Nah. They will lead hearts and that entry (if any) will be long gone prior to unblocking your K. Down one is good bridge, I suppose, if you can hold it to that.
Sept. 24, 2014
Randy Thompson edited this comment Sept. 24, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I started with bidding 4, but wound up doubling, which as I play it is responsive and denies 4 spades (although it doesn't deny 3). Leaving partner room to bid 3 and then pulling that to 4 should show this hand. If partner bids 4, I think that then a 4N bid should show longer diamonds than clubs but still not wanting to play spades. If partner has only spades, he should have started with 2 or 3 or 4.
Sept. 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks, Steve! I would bid 3 whether it showed three or not (if it was between a lie about hearts or a lie about spades these spades look more like 3 than the hearts do 6), but this makes sense and should win all post mortems. :)
Sept. 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I never re-read them, but I have Bulletins and Bridge Worlds going back into the 1970's. I may check to see if the local club wants at least the Bulletins. Corey is right, they are clutter, but . . . oh so hard to turn loose.
Sept. 22, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You can solve the hand shown by passing 1S
Sept. 22, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Back in college we played against a guy who would play things out slowly when he had all the rest of the tricks off the top. His last name was Davenport and we called it a “Davenport Squeeze,” and no, that was NOT a compliment. Time is always a factor.
Sept. 19, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't recall ever having the second auction. I tend to raise with 2+ support and very weak (know they are going to bid) or 3 card support and less than a game try (the fit says they'll bid at some point). If pass was right before, surely it's still right after they bid.
Sept. 19, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This is a harder problem at IMPs. I agree with Tom – don't hang partner for balancing or next time he'll fear he has to choose between -110 and going down in game (perhaps several tricks). I was closer to bidding 3 than to bidding now.
Sept. 19, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Demon be gone! Some of this sounds VERY tempting, but my partner might contract a hit on me if I even suggested it.

I would note that after 1M-2X, 2Y-?? we play that both 2M and 2N have TWO-card support for M. With 3-card support, suit X is a GREAT suit (two of top 3 honors or AJTxx or better) and if we have extras we rebid 3M and if we have already described the reason we are forcing game, we bid 4M. That way 2N can actually show a hand that wants to declare NT (with 12-14 or 18+) while 2M is worried about suit Z for No Trump. When we force game with support for M, we tell partner why asap with limited hands –

3OM…unspecified stiff in hand valuing to 12-15 suppt pts

Dbl JS…void showing with limited values

3N… Flat Rat Raise with 3+ of M and 12-14 HCP no stiff

1N then 4M…Secret Side Suit Raise (some 5+ suit not good enough to show, some stiff or void, only three card suppt and limited values of about 11-13 HCP)

New suit then 4M…GREAT suit but limited values

With hands too strong for those we bid a GREAT side suit (if we have one) and then bid 3M to show that and demand cues.

With hands too strong for one of the limited GF raises and lacking a side suit that is a source of tricks for slam, we use Jacoby 2N, even with only 3 card suppt (it is ASKING, after all, not SHOWING).

The reason for all that is to give opponents as little info about declarer's hand as possible unless responder has independent interest in slam.
Sept. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ditto.
Sept. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I play option two above with 2 of my 3 partners, and we also play 2M as the default hand when weak and flat and “scared of NT.” That leaves 2M as ambiguous. Responder's raise to 3M is also then ambiguous – either two card support and “scared of NT” or 3 card support and a slam-going hand. Those two are easy enough to sort out by assuming the weaker hand (opener bids 3N if he has a min flat hand w 5 card suit and anything else with 6+ of his suit) and having responder drive on over 3N by cue bidding or bidding with the stronger one. In 2/1 or KS, you have to have SOME way of showing extras because of the broad range of the opening bids.

In my Precision partnership, all rebids are shape-based, and relative hand strength irrelevant. A rebid of the four card suit is an “always” (except for 4 bad and 6 good of M), 2M shows 6 of M and denies 4 of any other suit and 2N shows 11-13 5-3-3-2 and says nada about stoppers (sort those out at 3 level if need be). Our 2 response there might just be a GF flat hand w/o support for M.

Both ways work fine (IMO). You just have to make sure you and partner are on the same page. The tighter range for the Precision 1M opener makes things a lot easier, as partner won't ever be far wrong picturing opener with a bad 12 count.
Sept. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I like to play that “bids below 3N tend to relate to playing 3N.” That would make this three spades w/o a (good) stopper. It can be important to play 3N with xxx opposite xxx (60% to split 4-3) where suit contracts will be off the first three tricks. With the actual hand, I think 4 stands out.
Sept. 16, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Not to worry. Partner will be looking at a spade suit with holes and likely only 3 hearts – he won't be raising here. Also, 4 wasn't forcing, yet partner might want to commit us to a grand? You say partner won't bid the grand 4 of 5 times? Make it 5 of 5 with an exception carved out for when he holds an unshown AK of trumps and you'll profit in the long run.

My partners and I play Kit's style and it wasn't from reading about it anywhere – it was from learning through painful experience that corrections or raises of leaps to slam were WAY more often wrong than right, even when they looked “obvious.” You took two chances here with the leap – the heart suit and the club suit. Reasonable chances to take, but this is the point. Partner may look at AQxx AQJ xx KQJx and think he has all anyone who cue bid and leaped to slam could ever need for the grand – right up until they cash the A at trick one or trick 13.
Sept. 16, 2014
Randy Thompson edited this comment Sept. 16, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Maybe it's semantics – they ARE going down but the reason isn't a heart stack; it's power. Partner certainly can pull, but he needs a reason.
Sept. 15, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
To avoid this ambiguity, my most regular partner and I define this is COG, with cuebids beginning at the next step (here 4), but that is a strange result. The reason it's strange is that bidding 2 then 3 (the way we play) shows a fit, a VERY good heart suit (two of top 3 honors or AJTxx or better) and spade support. 2 then 4 would show a VERY good heart suit and limited values. A slam try in hearts without 3+ spades would start with a cuebid of 4m or else RKC.
Sept. 15, 2014
.

Bottom Home Top