Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Randy Thompson
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It can get even worse. I preempted 2 and when we wound up doubled in a slam, I discovered that the 2N card had been on top of the pile at my first bid. I blamed a faulty bidding box rather than a faulty thumb. :)
Feb. 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If you bid 3 over 2 with this hand, you won't play 3 – you'll play 8 (4 doubled).
Feb. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It's a losing style to look for games without a BIG fit for partner over a 15-17 1N opener. You should pass a 2 correction – and hope to make it. Bidding 2 with only a 5 card major and some points isn't my idea of a good game plan. That sounds to me like a hand that should lead the major vs 1N.
Feb. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Want to tell us who is up first?
Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
IMO, continuations are all natural in (perhaps desperate) search of a plus score. 3 would say “I didn't understand the auction up until now, help me out.”
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I buy into Marty Bergen's “OBAR” bids in this auction. Any time they open the bidding 1X and the opening bid is raised to 2X, all bids are “as if balancing,” even in direct seat, even by an un-passed hand. This may or may not be best against hyper-aggressive opponents, but works very well in “real life.” Once your mind is freed of dreams of game, the hand short in their suit can get us into the auction comfortably and frequently. When they have a fit, we have a fit, and the LAW protects the bold. What it doesn't protect us from is a CHO who doesn't treat our bid (especially double) as a balance. If pard can't get with the program and keeps passing our take-out doubles for minus scores ending in 70 or bidding games down two doubled, well, then we can't use OBAR bids with that pard. Just as you can't hang pard for balancing, you can't hang him for pre-balancing. It is exactly the same situation.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I play that 2 was constructive (8-11 support points with 3-card support or 7-10 with 4-card support). 3 would have been preemptive with 4 and a cuebid would have been 12+ with 3 or 11+ with 4. When we are weak and RHO passes despite our fit here, LHO or CHO or both have a lot of extras. Passing with 4-card support would only happen if “too weak to preempt,” (a concept that could only happen in real life if vul) but common with 3-card support. There will be more bidding and showing the weak-with-3 later will be easier if 2 is still available. When I played it could be a POS with only 3-card support, I kept getting in trouble when CHO couldn't take a joke and kept getting us a level too high. Now, when I back in with 2, pard can get the 3-level decisions right more often.
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
These signals have been around for many decades. I learned them as “Rainbow Signals.” Anytime you are known to have length in a suit (and even if you haven't bid the suit pard is supposed to “know” from the bidding that you have length if you are looking at 5+ of the suit. High and Low are suit preference and middle encourages continuation of the suit (even if dummy is short) or says you don't have a preference, depending on the situation. This could be “I have something in both” or “I have nothing in either” when referring to the other non-trump suits. In some situations, this can amount to requesting a trump shift. Sometimes this comes up when pard might be leading a stiff ace in your suit and wants to know how to get to your hand for a ruff.
Feb. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Peg:

It's easier to cope with opening all 11 counts if your opening 1N range is 14-16. While my 2/1 partner and I who play this range don't open ALL 11 counts, this one has 2.5 QT; it has married honors in the suit we would open; its only minor honor is supported by a ten; and none of its points are in the doubleton. If you pass this one, then you must not open ANY flat 11 counts (which would be the case in my longest-standing partnership). My three partnerships would start with Pass, 1 or 1. I would be least happy with my systemic choice if it was pass, most happy if it was 1.

BTW, while I first tried 14-16 1N openers in a Meckwell Lite context, it also seems to work well in a 2/1 context and is now my favorite range. If you are going to open this hand playing 15-17 1N openers, your 1N rebids must show the dreaded 4-point range (11-14). But, if your range is 14-16, then is is exactly what pard would expect for a 1N rebid (not even the worst he would fear). The best thing about opening flat 11's is that when you pass, it is a “much louder” pass.

ANY bid you make here over 4 should show a hand this strong, so there is no reason to go all the way to slam on your own and no reason to bid 4N with xx in diamonds. IMO, telling him you have the club ace could help him devalue a club void is your best shot. Opening 1 and then dragging your feet later would have been even better, but that ship has sailed.
Feb. 4
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Whatever you tell them, most opponents play you for what THEY would have for a two-suiter.
Feb. 3
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't disagree w you Michael. “Eliminates” was an overbid. It is the best we can do under the circumstances. OTOH, getting rid of written defenses would surely require restricting where such bids can be made to team games with no upper limit and no tight time constraints.
Feb. 3
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I disagree that it is a good double. Is there any chance at down two with partner making a less-than-invitational 3 bid? Surely no greater chance than them making 11 tricks. If not, then the double risks 5 IMPs to gain 2. Are we that likely to beat them? It may be close, but I think not. I think the IMP odds here favor passing. We have at most one heart trick, at most two spade tricks and maybe or maybe not a club trick. For us to beat them, we are going to need partner to have an entry or a spade quack AND we need for the K to score.
Feb. 3
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When we agree to use a written defense, I always remind partner that if it comes up, we have to consult the written defense, even if we have no problem. This eliminates the UI problem.
Feb. 3
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
How many diamonds does 1 promise?
Is partner's hand limited and if so, to what?
If partner can be flat, what are his ranges for 1?
If it promises only 2+, I'd bid on all the hands, especially if he was limited to 15 HCP.
If 4+ then I'd only bid on the strongest one.
If 3+ then I'd bid on the second strongest one as well.
As I play with 3 pards and 1 promises 2, 3 and 4 respectively, I would say that my choice would vary.
The alternative to bidding 1 is passing and we need to know the risks of bidding (can pard bid 2N? force game with 18?) and passing (what is our worst possible diamond fit?)

BTW, the second hand has 5-3-3-3 shape.
Feb. 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If you play Kokish Relays and if responder to 2 is only allowed to get in the way of them with a double-negative hand (2 double neg for hearts and maybe for spades; 2 double neg for spades but not for hearts), then this is a clear 2 opener. 2-2, 2-2, 3-?? and the two red suits and the power have been shown quickly. With partners who are reluctant to play 2M as immediate double negatives, I play that 2 is the ONLY permitted response and there is no such thing as a double negative. That works okay as well. Two suiters with hearts are the only ones that I open 2 unless I have some crazy number of HCP (22+, which in the case of a two-suiter generates a lot of tricks).
Feb. 1
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When partner can use triage to describe his interest in slam (5m = hate it, Gap Bid = middling, 4N = love it and RKC), you can try aggressively. What does it take to try? Judgment. Points, losing tricks, controls, trump length and trump quality all play a part but what mix it takes to try should not be set in stone. Go for it when it seems right! If you handcuff yourself based on any one or two of those five factors, you will be ceding judgment to mechanical non-thinking. If you are playing matchpoints, I suppose you can make 4N the sign off, the Gap Bid keycard, and 5m the neither-love-it-nor hate it hand (aka a blame transfer), but if playing bridge, the slam try should simplify the auction to one relating to the level at which you will play in responder's minor – 5m, 6m or 7m.
Jan. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“ I am worried about partner competing at the 3 level expecting more shape.”

Poof! That one's gone in the flash. DON'T expect more shape!
Jan. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
John: We haven't missed pard's one-suiter yet! If they double 2, then we can still find his 6-card diamond suit when he bids it, or his 6-card club suit when he passes the double. With the double of 2, redouble can be the way to tell pard to bid his better major (thank you, kind opponents!). If you play that 2 shows 6 diamonds when they don't double 2 (I don't) then you haven't lost it ever. Where in the world do you find a field that lets you play 2 when pard has 6? If they don't double 2 then there you are in 2 with only one green card to put on the table to get to play it. So, we find the 6-card club suit whether or not they double and the 6-card diamond suit when they do double and could find it if they don't double if we wanted to give up asking the 2 bidder for his better major. If their double of 2 is a “train the guns” double, saying responder wants to put a hurt on at least one major, that is when you MOST need to be able to play that pass shows clubs, 2 shows diamonds and redouble forces opener to bid his longest/best major and 2M ends our part of the auction. Anyway, if missing a 6-card minor were all that you objected to, I think we could work out methods we agreed upon here. Most object to a LOT more than that. :)
Jan. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Nigel: With no regulatory edicts about what singletons you may in a 1N opener (as I assume is the case in New Zealand), would you consider opening the hand with a 12-14 1N (where the 12 can't be 4-3-3-3 and must have 2 quick tricks)? I would. I would probably stay with the field and open 1, figuring my rebid problems only come over a 2 response. But, if partner responded 1M and I raised to 2M (showing 4-card support and 15-17 support points), I'd turn down a general-invitation 3M bid by partner. IMO, it is often right to treat this pattern as 4-4-4-2.
Jan. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
All of the above discussion assumes we are nonvul. Vul, I retreat to being VERY conservative when poking the beast.
Jan. 31
.

Bottom Home Top