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All comments by Mark Kinzer
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At least your partner had to declare!
June 12, 2018
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Partner had:
xxx
xx
xxx
J10432
which I posted as a separate problem. In essence, Dan had the option of passing, for -790, or bidding, for -1400 or -1700. Interestingly, the votes are overwhelmingly in favor of his passing the takeout double, so the solvers got it right!
April 19, 2018
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Two of my favorite bridge books ever are Kit's “Matchpoints” and “Partnership Defense in Bridge”. I expect this book to be equally well written.
Sept. 21, 2017
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There are lots of us bridge playing actuaries hanging around!
Aug. 11, 2017
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Sounds like the plot in one of the chapters of Alan Sontag's excellent book “The Bridge Bum” (Morrow, 1977).
July 19, 2017
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I just got back from Washington yesterday. My favorite restaurant there was named Open City, on the corner of Calvert & 24th - a very short walk from the Marriott. Second favorite was the Italian place right around the corner on Connecticut, but VERY slow service.
July 26, 2016
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I pulled to 3C. It turns out that RHO was well stacked in clubs, but a scrambling crossruff worked out. Next time I'll pass.
Feb. 8, 2016
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I play the methods first outlined in Al Roth's book, Picture Bidding. 3S is a relay to 3NT, as described above (one or both minors, or to play). 2NT - 3NT shows K or Q sixth of either minor, and nothing else. The goal is to play 3NT when opener has a nice fitter, or 4m when he does not. If opener cannot see nine tricks, he pulls to the minor in which he cannot handle a notrump contract. A variation is that he always pulls to 4C, but at least in my version you can still get back to 4NT or 5m if pard has the other minor.
Feb. 2, 2016
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If you want to play the Powerball lottery 10 times, or 100,000 times, and not have it cost you a cent, try this. (for the record, I “bet” $100,000, and “won” 8,871, thus saving myself $91,129 by doing this on a simulator.)

http://graphics.latimes.com/powerball-simulator/
Jan. 11, 2016
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1342 (or is that 1331?) is a possibility if played at a lower level. In fact, Phil Warden's Precise Neo Roman (PNR) system, which combines a strong club with canape openers, has for years used 2NT as a Key Card raise, with the following response structure:
3C = 1 KC or 3+Q
3D = 3 KC or 1+Q
3H = 4 KC or 2+Q
3S = 2 KC, no Q
3NT = 0 KC.
Cheapest bid asks which holding, and if opener has the hand with fewer keycards, he simply bids game, because you know you are off 2 KC. If instead opener has the better response, he shows his second (main) suit.

This response structure would be usable by standard bidders, but because of the wider range in standard, it is probably a better fit for limited range openers.
Dec. 22, 2015
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Maybe these calls would be more acceptable if you gave the method a catchy name.
Bob Sundby's book “Breakthrough in Bridge” called these bids a “Hasty Heart” and a “Speedy Spade”.
Dec. 18, 2015
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Back in the 1970's a pair of young guns were experimenting with a strong pass system at the local club in Madison WI. One of the veterans of the club, named Emerson Stanley, heard RHO “open” with pass, duly alerted. Emerson announced “Double”. Director! Emerson still fumed why he couldn't double with his opening hand!
Oct. 22, 2015
Mark Kinzer edited this comment Oct. 22, 2015
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Here is my favorite hand that argues against upside down attitude:
Declaring after a 1NT-3NT auction, I held AKQ9 of spades opposite a small doubleton. My RHO shifted to a low spade from J8743, and my LHO had to signal from 10-2. He of course chose the 10, giving me a free finesse later.

The main thing I like about playing against UDCA is that they almost never falsecard. Admittedly, not world class opps, but that has been my experience.
Oct. 7, 2015
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This hand came up during a discussion of bidding methods. Should 3C here be nonforcing? What is 3S? How good should your hand be to bid 4C here?
July 31, 2015
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Try changing the zoom level (+/-) on your browser.
May 12, 2015
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I like your idea, Kit. I think the wider range (really only an additional point or two) is workable. It increases (doubles?) the frequency of Jacoby 2NT, and thus helps the accuracy of slam bidding opposite a limit raise. And freeing up 3M to be something else cannot be bad.
May 7, 2015
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Well, I have to admit that my decision to rectify the count via a diamond duck was poorly conceived. (I think RHO overtook her partner's jack because she had QT9 of diamonds - I had a spot wrong in the diagram.) It is a truism that we always need to be on the lookout for blind spots.

As for the double squeeze, I have always had difficulty seeing how to best run them. My instincts were that LHO could guard clubs and diamonds while RHO guarded hearts, and so no squeeze would be operating if RHO had the heart queen.

Kit's line is probably best, as it is a 75% line. Perhaps the second best line of play is to pitch a diamond when RHO ruffs. This gives up on a double squeeze, but preserves both the heart finesse and the club-heart squeeze, while rectifying the count.
May 7, 2015
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Sriram gave me help on an article last month, where I added an opening paragraph with the instructions:

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/is-this-a-claim-how-would-you-rule-2/
April 15, 2015
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If anyone can help in how to get the handviewer to show up in the article, I'd appreciated it.
March 11, 2015
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3NT as an 8-card minor preempt is part of Namyats. And…Namyats is Stayman (as in Sam Stayman), spelled backwards. Legend has it that Sam suggested some variation, and that an acquaintance said that Sam had it backwards. Voila!
March 9, 2015
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