Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Liam Milne
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Exactly, Martin. Cashing the King was so intuitively and obviously correct that I didn't see how declarer could have made it until later. Interesting how we form mental blocks sometimes.
Aug. 23, 2016
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Thanks, Gary.

If West returns a heart rather than a club, declarer wins and plays Ace, spade to the 9, ruffs a club and a spade back to the Jack to achieve the same winning position. Declarer simply uses one of dummy's entries to ruff a club now that they don't have to take the heart finesse.
Aug. 23, 2016
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Yes, I misunderstood my (Swedish) sources!
Aug. 15, 2016
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Correct, I did not consider the Open Youth championships or individuals. Thanks to the above for clarifying.
Aug. 14, 2016
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In the Junior series, Poland dominated throughout, leading the RR, and winning all three KO matches in convincing fashion.

Speaking from an Australian perspective, the Girls silver medal is particularly impressive - I believe it is Australia's highest ever result at a national World Championship, and certainly at Youth level. It is Australia's first Youth World Championship medal in 25 years.

Very well done to Renee Cooper, Ella Pattison, Kirstyn Fuller, Jessica Brake, Francesca McGrath, Ian Thomson (NPC), and Justine Beaumont (Coach)!!

Similarly, I have been told Sweden's bronze medal in the Juniors is their medal is their first Youth medal - well done to them :)
Aug. 13, 2016
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Nice article, Ben. I enjoyed it - several good points.
May 27, 2016
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If we only get one discard (when Gosney is on our left), will the D10 leave ambiguity about what we want partner to play? Or is that idea - suggesting strength in both suits?

At the time, I thought that a spade from partner followed by our heart shift will always take the maximum number of tricks, so S4 first discard in case we don't get a second chance.
May 25, 2016
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Congrats, Marty.

Did the committee give you the reasons for their decision?
May 13, 2016
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Thanks Jim!
March 4, 2016
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Thanks dude!
March 4, 2016
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Thanks Barry.
March 3, 2016
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Results from the table: 3NT is the big winner. Pass didn't net enough undertricks to be worthwhile. Contracts higher than 3NT fail.
Jan. 28, 2016
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Results from the table: Double gets +500, 4 does even better with +600. The opponents are in a 5-3 fit and partner has four diamonds and a good hand for you.
Jan. 28, 2016
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Results: 4S would get you significantly overboard this time. 3S kept you out of trouble.
Jan. 28, 2016
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Yeah, I know exactly what you mean mate.
Jan. 6, 2016
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With apologies to Billy Joel, Eric Kehr, and the public at large. This is what happens when you sit us out on morning matches Dave!
Oct. 3, 2015
Liam Milne edited this comment Oct. 3, 2015
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Well said, Steve. I really hope the discussion on this and other forums becomes less about being “anti-Europe”, and more about being “anti-cheating”. This isn't a time for patriotism.
Sept. 28, 2015
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Hi Steve,

I have got a hold of both volumes from Paul Lavings for Nye and I as we prepare for the Bowl this year.

I am a big fan of Martens in general as I have felt that he brings a modern approach to the game, and these two books are no exception. He looks at slam hands from top level play (usually world championships) and examines how top pairs got it right or got it wrong in the slam zone.

Martens also offers his own suggestions for bidding philosophies and system tweaks to help the reader improve their own slam bidding without changing their overall system too much.

These two books would be most valuable for a regular partnership to work on slam bidding together. They come with a CD each which has East and West hands for the partnership to bid (like a bidding challenge) - roughly 80 hands for each books. You can then read the book afterwards and see how you did against world-class pairs and read Martens' commentary on the auctions.

Overall, I would recommend these books, but would agree with Barry Rigal's comments above. These books will help you identify areas to look at, but won't necessarily give you all the solutions.

Hope this helps.
Liam
June 9, 2015
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At first, I thought this was a double squeeze. If declarer ducks the heart, without thinking it through deeply, a heart return looked as good as anything.

Now, declarer runs four rounds of clubs (pitching two spades), followed by three rounds of diamonds ending in the dummy, then the last club. This forces East to discard a spade, after which declarer can discard the heart, squeezing West in spades/diamonds.

East can beat the hand after the heart is ducked by returning a spade! This breaks up the double squeeze by attacking the entries in the doubly-held suit.

Solution as shown is very cute. Nice hand!
April 19, 2015
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Nice article. I feel like the idea around what bids should mean in undiscussed or murky situations is one that hasn't been discussed much.

Would love to hear any other stories people have along the same vein.
Feb. 7, 2015
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