Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Kit Woolsey
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 423 424 425 426
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't buy that partner would lead the queen of hearts with a club void. If he does so and catches me with the ace, how can he expect me to work out what he has done. It will be normal for me to play him for QJ of hearts, so I will be winning the ace and returning a heart to establish a third round trick in the suit.

Partner didn't lead a singleton club, and declarer can be assumed to not have a singleton for the 2NT opening. That means that partner probably is void in clubs.

There is no reason to overtake, and that might establish a heart trick for declarer. Simply encourage and let partner continue the suit. I will have an interesting problem when in with my ace of hearts. Probably best is the 10 of clubs. It will look to declarer that I am making a surround plan from K108x or Q108x, so he might go up ace hoping partner has stiff king or queen or that this will block the suit.
8 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't agree that West would ever cash the ace of spades when he doesn't hold the king of diamonds and his partner encourages in hearts. From West's point of view, declarer's hand could be Kxx x Ax KQxxxxx, and cashing the ace of spades would hand declarer a no-play contract.
10 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If East hadn't played the king of hearts you certainly would have played him for the king of clubs, taking your 5 to 2 odds. It is only because you know East started with the king of hearts that it might be right to play West for Kx of clubs.

East heard the bidding. He knows you have a stiff heart. He did not need to play the king.

It isn't difficult for East to see the end position coming up. If East is a good player and doesn't have the king of clubs, he would never have shown you the king of hearts. His only reason for showing it to you is to deflect you from your percentage play.

So, my answer depends upon your judgment of East's skill level.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Sure, 4NT could go down on a bad day if partner has a mis-fitting minimum and things lie badly. It is all a matter of risk vs. reward. You must ask yourself the following question:

If I bid 4, which is more likely:

Getting to 4NT down 1 (or 6 of a minor down 1)

Getting to 6 of a minor making.

My judgment is that getting to 6 of a minor making is more likely than getting to something going down.
Oct. 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
South's pass of 3NT is a joke. Even if North has a mis-fitting minimum, 4NT figures to be safe.

After South properly bids 4, North is easily worth a slam try with 4 (or 4 if that would clearly be a slam try – for me it would be an offer to play), and after that South has a clear slam drive.
Oct. 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
There is no clue from West's defense. West has a routine heart continuation after East encourages, since it is inconceivable that East would encourage holding 5 hearts and the king of spades, the only layout where a heart continuation can be wrong.

There is some clue from the bidding. West would be less likely to double with a stiff small diamond than with the stiff king. Whether this clue compensates for the 5 to 1 odds is doubtful.

Unfortunately, when East shows out of diamonds West knows your whole hand. There is no way he will ever mis-defend.

The only thing I can think of is to cross to dummy with a club and lead the queen of diamonds. East doesn't know your exact hand. He may think you are 2-1-3-7 and his partner has QJx of clubs and is void in diamonds. East might come up with some reason to cover the queen of diamonds, or at least think about it. It won't occur to him that a huddle would give anything away, since obviously you are planning on taking the diamond finesse. So, if East plays small with no problem you might back your table feel and play to drop the stiff king.
Oct. 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, 5NT would be pick a slam, as it always is if not part of the king ask structure. We never play any kind of third round control asks after bidding RKC.

It is an interesting idea, and certainly should have been taken into consideration. If partner has 4 diamonds he will bid 6, and if he has 4 spades he will bid 6. Otherwise, he will bid 6. As you say, you can then pass 6, but bid 6NT over anything else. Since South bid 6NT without further probing, this approach can only lead to a better contract, never a worse contract. Once again, leaping to slam is always wrong.

There is one strike against 5NT. In the variations where North bids 6 and South bids 6NT, an astute West might wonder why South didn't just bid 6NT immediately. West might be more likely to deduce the potential spade weakness. Whether this downside compensates for the upside of getting to 6 when North has 4 diamonds is not clear.
Oct. 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The RKC bidder would be asking for kings without all the key cards only if he felt a superior 6NT contract might be reached if responder has a critical king. The responder would be bidding 6NT only if he had so much stuff that he judged there is a grand if all the key cards are accounted for. When both these conditions exist, it is hard to imagine there would be an issue as far as wrongsiding 6NT goes. However, if responder is concerned about wrongsiding 6NT but wants to get to a grand if all the key cards are accounted for, he can simply bid 6 of some suit higher than 6 of the trump suit. This can only mean that he wants to play 7 of the trump suit if all key cards are accounted for, and if the RKC bidder knows a key card is missing he will bid 6NT and the contract will be played from the right side.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If West has a stiff spade and AK doubleton of clubs, he definitely would have cashed the AK of clubs and gotten a signal from his partner what to do next. This would make far more sense than leading a singleton spade.
Oct. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't see any chance if West has led from K107(x) or from a doubleton, so I'll assume he has a stiff spade. He also needs AK of clubs for there to be a chance. So, I'll play him for 7 xxx KJ1098x AKx.

I will win the ace of spades and play 4 rounds of trump, giving West a chance to pitch a small diamond (I can't afford to lead my last trump, as I will need that to collect my long club). Now I play a club. West might make the mistake of ducking, in which case I will make. If he properly plays king, ace, and a club, I win in dummy and come of with a small diamond. Hopefully either East is asleep at the switch or West has discarded his smallest diamond and is now forced to win the trick.
Oct. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'm not exactly sure how to answer this question. If partner is going to be passing your 2m rebid then obviously the opponents are more likely to enter than if you pass 1NT, both because there are two of them who can act and they know from your 2m rebid that the hand is probably a fair double-fit. On the other hand, if partner is raising your 2m rebid to the 3-level now it is more difficult for the opponents to balance, since they will be committing to the 3-level.
Oct. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Our rule is that we don't make correctional bids when partner has rebid a suit at the 3-level.
Oct. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Perhaps what you suggest is theoretically superior. We choose to keep our RKC rules the same in all situations. This simplifies the memory issues and reduces the danger of a mixup or one partner forgetting a special situation. We believe this is more important than whatever tiny gain there might be for altering the definitions for this special situation.
Sept. 29
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Correct. However, if responder has that hand with 4 spades he might choose to start with double and then cue-bid in order to keep open finding a 4-4 spade fit.
Sept. 29
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I do not buy that the meaning of the 3 call makes the slightest difference about North's 5 call.
Sept. 27
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Mainstream among experts is suit-preference in trumps.
Sept. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
No. This is from partner's point of view.
Sept. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
East might not mind a heart lead, but he isn't getting one after North transfers to hearts. From East's point of view, on balance he certainly prefers a diamond lead to a spade lead – imagine partner having the kings of both suits. Keep in mind that a double of 21D isn't a command to lead a diamond. It is simply a statement of what East prefers.
Sept. 22
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You suspect strongly that he does so in an attempt to get a read on the opponents. After 5 minutes of tanking he guesses the distribution correctly.

I don't see any basis at all for this conclusion. Declarer simply is thinking about what play to make. He isn't required to play quickly because if he tanks the opponents might give something away. And if they do give something away and declarer reads it, he is certainly entitled to try to take advantage of his read (which of course might be wrong).
Sept. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, it does apply here. It is true that the 1 opener doesn't have a real minimal 1-suiter. That helps the odds somewhat on the 2 response.
Sept. 15
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 423 424 425 426
.

Bottom Home Top