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All comments by Kit Woolsey
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Richard,

Let's look at my example hand of Jx AJx !Axxxx QJx.

Suppose responder has a hand such as AKQxxx 10x Qx xxx. Has he misbid in some way? And isn't 3NT a much better contract than 4?

Of course if instead opener's hand is something like Jx AKx AJxxx xxx, then 4 is where you belong. This is the hand on which opener should choose 4 over 3NT, and should bid 4 in case responder has slam ambitions.

The important point is at this time in the auction the focus is finding the best strain for game. If responder has some slam interest he can show it later. But for now opener assumes that choice of games is the issue and bids accordingly.
Dec. 12
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3 is in no way a slam try. At this point it is choice of games.

The 3 call doesn't necessarily show a good diamond suit. It simply shows a 5-card diamond suit, and not 3 spades. Since opener also doesn't have 4 hearts (no 2 call) and doesn't have 4 clubs (no 3 call), opener's distribution is exactly 2-3-5-3, information which could be very valuable to responder.

All opener's 3NT call says is that in light of his previous auction (i.e. having shown his shape), he prefers 3NT to 4. This would be quite consistent with a hand such as: Jx AJx Axxxx QJx. Opener certainly wouldn't be bidding 4 with this hand.

Therefore, responder is certainly worth a slam try, and 4NT seems pretty reasonable.
Dec. 12
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If spades are 3-3, I don't think we need East to have more than 1 diamond (assuming of course that West has stiff king of hearts and East has at least 3 clubs). Duck first trick. Win (say) club return. Ace of hearts. Heart finesse. Cash ace of diamonds. Spade, spade, spade ruff. Club ruff. And now put winning spades through East, pitching diamonds if he never ruffs.

Is this better than playing East for 3 diamonds and 2 spades, following Khokan's line? I don't really know.
Dec. 11
Kit Woolsey edited this comment Dec. 12
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If partner is 4-3-3-3, it might occur to him that 6 tricks are easier than 9 in a non-fit so he might pass the takeout double. Sure, sometimes the opponents might make when partner is weak. That is the price of doing business.
Dec. 10
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I'm afraid that I am not qualified to answer you question. Your shrink is far more qualified.
Dec. 9
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I don't think that matters. Every player is going to take some time on their first discard, regardless of their methods and the hand.
Dec. 9
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Quite likely. On this auction it would be a very attractive lead.
Dec. 9
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Is that so terrible when 2 is making? And on this hand partner has close to the worst distribution.
Dec. 9
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And when diamonds get continued, what does declarer do? If he finesses, he might be in for a rude surprise when the lead turns out to be from king-doubleton.
Dec. 9
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In your previous posting, you gave examples of where the player did not make a seemingly normal overcall when his partner was weak with no support, but made a lighter overcall when his partner had values and some support. This seems to imply that the player knew something about his partner's hand.

On the hand in this posting, North failed to overcall (or make a takeout double, or bid Michaels – probably not available at the time this was played), yet his partner had both good spade support and values. That would appear to contradict what you are implying in the previous posting.

If you are trying to show something via statistics, you can't cherry pick like this. You must state your hypothesis, whatever it is. Then you must examine every hand played by the pair, not just the ones you choose to examine, and see if the hypothesis holds up.
Dec. 7
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It is inconceivable that West has anything but the stiff jack of hearts, regardless of how good a player he is. He doesn't know your exact heart spots or how many hearts you have (you could easily have 6). From his point of view your hearts could be solid except for the jack, and you are about to take a losing heart finesse.
Dec. 6
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I play all such doubles as lead-directing. If you have a takeout double, you can always pass and then double if they stop at 2 of the major. If they bid higher on their own, you probably don't want to be in the auction.
Dec. 5
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Sometimes the 4-3 fit works better. Sometimes the 5-2 fit works better. It is difficult to say which is likely to succeed.

It is possible that partner is 5-5 in the majors. If that is the case, obviously bidding the 3-card major when 3-2 will be more successful.
Dec. 4
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My opinion is that as an opponent I would love to be able to double the artificial 2 call for a lead or possibly letting us compete in diamonds, something I couldn't have done after a simply 2 raise.
Dec. 4
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yes
Dec. 4
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On the first hand, knowing the distribution won't necessarily get West off to the the best defense. For example, suppose East's hand is xxxxx x AQ10xx Jx. Now the jack of diamonds shift is necessary to defeat the contract. Add the ace or king of clubs to the East hand, same distribution, and the jack of diamonds shift is the difference between down 1 and down 2.

It is much more important for West to know where East's strength lies. This should be shown via a suit-preference signal. A high spade shows strength in diamonds, and a low spade shows strength in clubs. On this hand East doesn't have particular strength in either suit, so he should play the 6 of spades to indicate that. Now West might get it right if he works out the hand. Even if West doesn't work out the full hand he should continue spades, since a minor-suit shift can't gain if East isn't showing strength in either minor.
Dec. 2
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Seems like if you play anything but a spade that is an admission that you have nothing in hearts. I don't think you want to tell declarer that.
Nov. 30
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Do the opponents play support doubles? What card did East play at trick 1? What are the enemy signaling methods when dummy has a singleton?
Nov. 30
Kit Woolsey edited this comment Nov. 30
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Declarer isn't playing the 7 from A873.
Nov. 30
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If declarer stadrted with A1087, he surely would have won the first trick. I can't come up with a layout where continuing with a club honor is wrong.
Nov. 29
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