Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jim Perkins
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Since this was the Nebraska Regional . . . in Unit 214 we had at least 3 10 card suits in one year in the early 90s.

A player to remain unnamed who had something of a temper held 10s AKQ behind my modified precision 1 opening (could be zero s). He laid a trap by PASSing, and of course his partner, holding 6s could not find a balancing bid. The post mortem did not begin with, “Gee, I don't think you should PASS there in the balancing seat.”

A partner/mentor who was always extremely well-accessorized, picked up her 10 card suit and it was, obviously, s.

And finally, on The Sierra Network, but nevertheless while I was a member of U214, I picked up mine . . . s.

So, yes, I do think that there is something mystical about bridge.
Aug. 14
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Everything in Council Bluffs is nice. Even, after 35 years, ex-wifes. But especially grandchildren. And on this trip, Dads, brothers, Aunts and cousins.
Aug. 14
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@ Steve: Who is paying for the space in which to hold such a game and who is providing the equipment?
Aug. 12
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We don't have the kind of rent problem that Honors has, but we do have rent to pay . . .

Let me ask you Jeff, do you get any blowback from your hardcore competitors? How much floor space do you have? (We have only one main area (could hold 25 tables, but probably not in two sections of a different type of game) and a smaller room about 8 tables (7 is really almost too many, but in a pinch)).
Aug. 12
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War (ranks of cards)

Whist (mechanics of play and partnerships)

Duplicate whist (mechanics of competition in the same hands)
Aug. 12
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The Honors model might work but it's definitely a different model. It might be one that we are all forced to apply eventually. They are transitioning toward what I would call more of a general social club than just a bridge club. The food is definitely an upgrade from our club. But I feel they could attract even more attendees with jigsaw puzzles or, especially, mAh johng.
Aug. 12
Jim Perkins edited this comment Aug. 12
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I am sure I am not average for our club. But I do shepard through many of them to their first competitive experiences.

If they don't want that they generally don't find their way to me. I am not a good resource for people that want a non competitive experience.
Aug. 12
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ACBL sanctioned bridge has always been where I find the better and most competitive games. There may be better games where money is at stake, but I have never sought them out nor found them.

If you are just looking for conviviality and a pass time, in all honesty there are better than bridge.

But if you want a high level mental challenge then bridge, and “real bridge” is best. And by real bridge, I mean bridge with rules, among others, “one hand, one player” are essential. Why?

Because we are trying to measure best against each other and in order to do that we need a standard. The acbl creates and enforces that standard. Otherwise the results are random.

ACBL masterpoints are also, believe it or not, useful as a measure of past accomplishments. That some people have turned them into something they are not and were never meant to be is unfortunate but they are still useful as a measure of cumulative past successes.
Aug. 12
Jim Perkins edited this comment Aug. 12
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To David's teammate: you will, as you grow and mature, be almost constantly stunned and amazed at the general incompetency of virtually everyone you meet anywhere. Take cheer. Their incompetence is a reflection of your competence.

If you continually let it upset you this much, you are in for a very miserable life. So just get used to it. Not every umpire gets every call right. And ACBL directors may on the whole not be in the top half of accuracy.
Aug. 9
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First and overriding rule of preempts: don't leave OPPs no choice but to x.
Aug. 7
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Like x 100 Phil.
Aug. 7
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I am thinking more along the lines of when they accidentally/randomly do something that is perfect for the situation to seize upon that and make it the lesson of the day. Also, I am talking about one on one play not classroom setting.
Aug. 7
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Jeff what you call muscle memory I call brute force repetition. Some are willing to do this and some are not (they want to play bridge, not work bridge).

But regardless of method, what I am talking about is something different.

Right now it seems like my instinct or impulse is to remark, “You did that wrong.” They acknowledge it retain it for a couple of hands, then do something else wrong, and something else, then eventually forget the first lesson and repeat the error. In the meantime, they are doing many things right that could be commented upon . . . But aren't.

Since they are going to forget in a couple of days or weeks anyway, why not work on trying to get them to repeat things done well? And why is it so hard for me to flip my mindset?
Aug. 7
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My sympathies. A great reminder to tell those we appreciate that . . . well, we appreciate them.
Aug. 6
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A player that after a decade or more of playing bridge does not have a regular list of partners . . . there is generally a reason.

And it is not bad bridge which most of our players wouldn't recognize if they committed it. Their partners however . . . .

As I say when trying to move the games along . . . the post mortems in this room are not worth the time or breath required.
Aug. 6
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I guess the LA “entitlement” culture is not spreading.

Good to hear.
Aug. 6
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We have had it happen more than twice and really don't even try very hard anymore.
Aug. 6
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USA experience with Swiss Pairs has been fairly awful. If it's different over there would love to hear about it.

Here resorting the movement takes too long.

And the IMP scoring in a short match is extremely high variance (too much luck/randomness).
Aug. 4
Jim Perkins edited this comment Aug. 4
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15-20 days, give or take. With every day a charity special.
Aug. 3
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As a former author of that column, I can tell you that mine were banged out in about 20 minutes, generally after receiving a prodding email from the newsletter's editor, and while edited a bit after that . . . I was generally not that cooperative with the editing process.

Not sure what Brian's situation is, but I came to the conclusion that I simply lacked the time required to produce even a passable product.

In other words, I vote with Dan. If we were computers we could justify responding to what was said rather than what was meant. But we are humans.
Aug. 3
Jim Perkins edited this comment Aug. 3
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