Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jeff Bayone
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We have separate rooms for our Canasta and Mah Jongg players so no problem.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
And we are!
We've branched out into Scrabble, Mah Jongg, Canasta, even Gin.
Got to fill those seats. BTW: We've found that having these other games is a way of getting many of our once a week duplicate players playing with us two or more times a week. They've brought their Mah Jongg and Canasta games to us. Jigsaw puzzles has been proposed. So has Settlers of Catan.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I wanted to get feedback from both teachers and players. Also a lot more eyes see it here.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If I were going to start them with a game other than bridge, Oh Hell would be my choice. Oh Hell has them predicting how many tricks they figure to take on any given hand. So, when dealt a poor hand, they can get a positive result even if they don't take a single trick, as long as that was what they predicted at the start. The person with the highest bid gets to name a trump suit or play in no trump.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Oh for the good old days!
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We have 70 tables of social play a week.
Need I say more? Maybe I do.
We teach, then our students join in social supervised play sessions. Some of these practice sessions are more teaching oriented than others. They get one month free after both the Beginner 2 and Beginner 3 courses. By then, they are as hooked as they will ever be. Either bridge or the club grabbed them or it didn't.
From there, when and if they are ever ready to try their hand in a more competitive environment, they know Novice duplicates exist.
Every session we get a few tables that come as a foursome just for a social afternoon.
BTW: We charge the same for social bridge as we do for duplicate.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A 23 table game! Once a week? Has anyone thought of maybe adding a second and maybe even a third session?
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
OK Larry.
Care to share?
Three years ago (2017), did you have this event at all?
Did it include a newcomer session?
BTW: What is a newcomer? 49er, 99er, 299er?
Has anything changed significantly in the past couple of years?
Is a new teaching program, or a new emphasis in neighboring clubs placed on developing players, contributing factors?
Anything that comes to mind has to be helpful.
What we tried successfully in NYC with Newcomers is having a two-session trophy-award-winning event. This is in addition to our regular single session games that we run every other day during the five or six days of each of the two NYC Regionals.
Aug. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Sounds good. The part about Precision doesn't work for me, but I'm sure I'm not seeing it the way you do.
In our case, the “problem” with the way you expose your beginners to bridge, is that most students, coming to our Beginner 1 course, want to see what bridge is all about, the play and the auction. In our six session, “Taste of Bridge” course, we feel it is necessary to expose them to at least the concept of bidding. That seriously limits the time we can allot to playing. Play still accounts for 75% of the course, just not the 100% you and I would prefer.
Aug. 11
Jeff Bayone edited this comment Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
100% dead on. The bridge community needs to understand this. It really does take a year or more's effort to bring the average student, coming to class with almost no experience with cards, to get to the point where playing in a novice game makes any sense at all.
Make sure you do everything you can to grab them ASAP. First ten minutes or less. What grabs them? Taking tricks, period, end of discussion. All the rest, the beauty of how everything eventually comes together, can only happen if we grab them first. And quickly too. There are far too many other activities out there vying for their attention.
At the first session we have them add up partnership points then divide by three and that number becomes how many tricks they are attempting to make. Next…we walk away and just let them play. Now, and for sessions to come, positive reinforcement only. “Down three? NICE TRY.” There is no right or wrong. There's plenty of time for that in a bridge player's life.
Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
AKQJ2…How many points is this suit worth?
At 3 pts a trick…about 15.
What's the value of Kx in a suit that your partner opens with a weak-two ahead of you? About 18 pts….six tricks. We have entire series of classes at Honors dealing with just these type of questions.
But not for beginners!!!
Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Oh, damn. Forgot Garbage Stayman. Make that at least 101 2hr classes.
Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Actually Joe, it comes to 3 and 1/13 points a trick. 3NT becomes 27 and 9/13. That's probably about how many points a beginner needs anyway. But I really like the adjustment you made. 37 points in one hand would yield 13 tricks. Nice.
The point is, it ties the point count system and the idea of points representing a substitute for tricks together neatly.
We use that same 3 points is a trick when we discuss bidding in general. For example: The range for a limit raise, 10-12, is 3 points or a trick. What I like to tell my students is that if they can take an ace or a king out of their hand and still make the same raise of their suit or partner's, then something's wrong. Or, what's the difference between a raise of one spade to two or three spades? A trick, three points.

BTW: The most important number of points in bridge bidding is 24. 3 into 24 is 8 or 2NT. That's how we start off discussing why you need 11 total points to make a 2/1 bid. If you don't agree on a fit with partner, the lowest level contract that you can get out in, in a 2/1 auction, is 2NT. That requires 24 points. Partner brings 13 to table when they open. You must supply the rest or 11 points to go beyond a 1NT response.
Aug. 11
Jeff Bayone edited this comment Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
What constitutes a beginner lesson? If it contains a general concept or basic material that a student has not been exposed to before, I'd consider that a Beginner lesson. As an example, in all the 18 lessons that make up Honors three intro courses, not one mention is made of how to raise a minor suit. It is only in our Advanced BEGINNER classes (yes there are over 50 of them Randy) that we introduce the Inverted structure. We choose not to first teach our new students that 1m -2m is 6 to 9 because, whenever possible, we try never teaching something that has to be untaught later on.
I haven't counted, but without repetition, I'd bet there are well over 100 2hr classes that, by my definition, could be considered beginner in nature.
Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In A Taste of Bridge, the beginner book Chris refers to, the first half is devoted to card play. How to create tricks. When I do get to bidding I try to continue the concept of bridge being about tricks.
Here's my introductory no-trump structure lesson:
Aces are 4, etc.
There are 40 HCP in the deck. 13 possible tricks.
13 into 40 = 3. A trick is 3 HCP.
A 1NT contract requires 7 tricks or 21 points, 2 NT is 8 tricks (24 HCP). For 3NT you need 9 tricks (27 points), but bidding and making nine tricks or more in no-trump gives you a huge bonus. So huge we shave a point or so when bidding it.
Now class add your points and your partner's points and lets start bidding and playing.
Oh, one more thing class, since we have been shown that length often takes tricks, from now on I'd like you to add one extra point for a fifth card in a suit.
Aug. 11
Jeff Bayone edited this comment Aug. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Now that is impressive.
Aug. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Do you know how many sessions those 46(49) tables were spread over?
Aug. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I didn't think so.
Aug. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
John,
Love to have you. You'll be our guest.
Would that extra few thousand help with advertising in any way?
Aug. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If more money were thrown your way, would it be helpful, and if so, how?
Aug. 8
.

Bottom Home Top