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All comments by Jeff Bayone
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You can?
Aug. 29
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Every hand's an adventure.
Aug. 29
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I don't think 15 to 17 is standard. In NYC it IS standard…period.
Aug. 27
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Ian,
Then with 12 -14 no one alerts.
Aug. 27
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Again…if it is the “standard” 15 - 17 then it need not be alerted.
Aug. 27
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Just not 15 to 17 if that's what it is.
Aug. 27
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Bridge evolves. I remember having to say “alert” first after a transfer. Then, when asked, saying,“transfer”. Then it became just “transfer”. When will it evolve to saying nothing? I've waited way too long.
My pet peeve is having to announce, “15 to 17”. If it isn't, announce it. I hate feeling like a puppet. If I'm forced to announce 15 - 17 why not be consistent. 1S, “A good 11 to as much as a bad 22”. Or 2H, “5 to 11 HCP and a good 6-card suit.” And so on.
Aug. 27
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Steve, to your point.
Seems I'm not alone.
From personal experience I do not believe that artificially induced “alertness” improves thinking. Just the opposite. A calm mind, a mind at rest, analyzes best. Speed kills.
“Going over something in my mind” and “looking at something from every angle” are more than just common expressions.
While coffee may help with assembly line thinking or dredging up stored facts for an SAT test, all it does for me is get my brain racing. I find I can't stay with a thought as easily as I'd like. Can't follow it through methodically, relaxed. Can't turn it over and over. I feel it. It's like the part of the brain, the muscle part, is stimulated, but it wants to race ahead. Synapses aren't muscle. They fire differently. Making them race, to jump from one thought to another, is a barrier to “deep thinking”. I want to control the speed at which my brain works. I don't want caffeine or anything else messing with it. It works perfectly, left alone, just the way it has evolved.
On the other hand, I drink about six cups of coffee a day. I run a bridge club. I need to stay alert. No deep thinking needed during business hours. I leave that for between 4 and 5 am. That's about as deep as I get.
Aug. 27
Jeff Bayone edited this comment Aug. 27
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Barry,
Cocaine? Really? No side effects? Try getting inferences when your brain is going a mile a minute.
Aug. 26
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Nothing beats nothing. Unless you need something. Then it's probably each to his or her own.
Aug. 26
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Rather than giving this part of the course to beginners, I'd give it to the experienced players you encounter that seem to really need it.
Aug. 24
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The point is newbies should not be in open duplicate games to begin with. My guess would be several months of supervised social bridge, several months of some form of laid back newplicate where the rules are gently enforced. Then duplicate, but even then, a 299er or 750 at most. Of course not every club has this luxury.
Aug. 22
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Yes, but they move out!
Aug. 22
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Perhaps the single biggest games of all time were the twice a week games on Long Island that Michael Kups used to run with his mother. NO DIRECTOR calls were permitted except in the most dire of situations. Two heart aces in the same deck might qualify. Short of that, work it out among yourselves. He had 70 to 90 tables a session. “Real” by the book clubs within a few miles of his, struggled to get two sections. Aaron Silverstein runs the club now and adheres to those principals. Aaron runs two traditional clubs in NYC at the same time.
We run two novice games plus two 99er games a week. Director calls are rare. Every one is for a technical mistake. A revoke, an illegal bid, 12 and 14 card hands. I can't recall a hesitation call. Most of the players don't realize that that might infer something. At Honors developing players are treated with kid gloves. The emphasis is strictly on them having a good experience. The quality of the bridge takes a back seat.
The reasons should be obvious.
Teach beginners ethics and proprieties at your peril and only if you do not have a social game or a novice game to help ease these new players in. The only thing that will turn a new player off more than a list of do's and don't is a bunch of know-it-all officious players that play more for the controlling aspect of the game than for the love of the game.
Aug. 21
Jeff Bayone edited this comment Aug. 21
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The mind is a terrible thing to waste. The school initiative that G and B tried to support was aimed at education. The thought was to try stimulating young brain cells through games playing. But adults need mental stimulation too, if only to help ward off the effects of dementia. Surely this is a good enough cause for the two of them to consider embracing.

The bridge world mental health initiative.
Aug. 19
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The School Bridge League knew nothing about bridge and was inept on top of that. We tried to do something with them and it was hopeless. Everything needed explaining in triplicate. Funds were ridiculously modest at best. I can't imagine that only $400,000 of the million was returned. We wound up using most of our own money to fund the one activity we tried having as a joint venture. I think we got all of 4 or 5 hundred from months of back and forth. Our club, the school, the school program, what they were going to be doing at our club, all needed to be vetted and vetted again and again. How 600,000 got used is mind boggling. What part of that went to the SBL I wonder? Why didn't G and B go directly to the clubs? We are the professionals. What a wasted opportunity for all involved.
Aug. 19
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The School Bridge League knew nothing about bridge and was inept on top of that. We tried to do something with them and it was hopeless. Everything needed explaining in triplicate. Funds were ridiculously modest at best. I can't imagine that only $400,000 of the million was returned. We wound up using most of our own money to fund the one activity we tried having as a joint venture. I think we got all of 4 or 5 hundred from months of back and forth. Our club, the school, the school program, what they were going to be doing at our club, all needed to be vetted and vetted again and again. How 600,000 got used is mind boggling. What part of that went to the SBL I wonder? Why didn't G and B go directly to the clubs? We are the professionals. What a wasted opportunity for all involved.
Aug. 19
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Have't looked at the link yet…the operative word, the one that stuck out, is one.
Aug. 19
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I know this thread is not about Gates and Buffet but for those interested in the million Warren supposedly put up for teaching children, I can speak to this from experience.
The people he entrusted with the money were not bridge people. Worse, they were hopeless at following through on anything. Getting a few bucks from them required jumping through hoops and endless explaining what was to be done with it and unanswered calls and emails. Honors had a chance to host a large group of inner city kids from New Jersey. A busload. Funding was to be about $1000. This took months. In the end they received a fraction of it. Enough for a van. About a dozen kids showed up. We paid instructors and hosts out of our own pocket rather than deal one more time with Buffet's organization.
For a smart guy, why he didn't ask professionals how best to spend a million or so dollars is beyond comprehension. I don't agree with those who say Buffet and Gates shouldn't get involved in a big way in bridge. The benefits, both for children and everyone else, in learning and playing are enormous. World health starts at home. Help support education. Help support winning the fight on dementia and aging. Support this game you love. If you appreciate how beneficial and important it can be in people's lives throw some money behind it. The chess guy in St. Louis does. $50,000,000 or so and it HAS made a huge impact. 50 mil here, 50 mil there, a few Super Bowl ads, a few ads on the Academy Awards, you know, stuff that has a chance to change people's perspective of what bridge is all about. At this point, I'd bet 90% of the country doesn't even know it's a card game.
If they do, they think of it as a little old lady's game that really complicated. There's an oxymoron for you.
Aug. 18
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The Utah event holds three 2-session games on three consecutive days. I've been told a luncheon is included in the $79 registration fee and so is a banquet dinner. I believe it too is on one of the three days. The card fee is 4 or 5 dollars per session. So $79 plus $4 times six sessions comes to about $17 a session with lunch and dinner and all the extras, like screenings, that come with being a part of the games. Plus, Utah that time of year must be glorious.
Aug. 18
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