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All comments by Jane Eason
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Jim, thanks for sharing. I'm familiar with balancing actions showing a king less than in other seats. But I haven't heard of or thought of relating the need of another king to reach the next bidding level. Interesting.

Jeff, before teaching a workshop based on your book, "A Taste if Bridge, it hadn't occurred to me that a trick might have a point-count value. That revelation helps me teach beginners. (By the way, my next Taste of Bridge Workshop is next month. This time, I'll also teach the beginning lessons that follow. )

I teach, and use, The Losing Trick Count when it seems right to bid more or less than the point-count value or dummy-point value of a hand. Subtracting the partnership's total losers from 24 gives students an idea of the best level.

I currently teach the LTC before a 199er game. This gives the player a second method to evaluate his hand, and a way to decide if a hand is suitable for n overcall.
Dec. 16, 2019
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Good Luck, Jim!

I wish I'd had your training. It would have helped with a law I recently read to the table. I was surprised to find, after flipping around in the book that I had no idea what it said.

I am sure you were a great director and that the folks will miss you and appreciate you even more after you have left the job.

Thanks to all here who have made this discussion one of the best on this forum, so far.

Jeff, where is that list?
Dec. 14, 2019
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Barbara, do your directors run three games simultaneously with no assistance?
Dec. 3, 2019
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Are you on facebook? I tried to send you a picture here, but couldn't do it. Our new facility is beautiful.
Nov. 29, 2019
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Our table tops must not be Formica because they are not slippery. They are wood grain, but not the cheap stuff, and they look good. We recently moved to a beautiful site. Did you play at Lightman when you lived in Memphis?

Pete and Sam's is the best!!
Nov. 29, 2019
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Morris, restaurant-supply houses and contract furniture companies should have the quality chairs and tables you're looking for. And you might find someone to make side tables. (Amish?)

Our club uses a commercial bussing cart for handing out boards and for picking up after the game. A former club owner bought it for us, and all the directors depend on it.

I love our furniture–comfortable, upholstered, non-stacking arm chairs; black plywood side tables, made by a volunteer for the cost of supplies; and permanent, Formica-top tables with heavy, wrought-iron pedestals.

The card tables have adjustable glides, but players still “fix” wobbles with folded napkins. We have felt glides on all furniture to protect the floor.

Editing to add another source-Library furniture supply houses. Library furniture is usually
top quality.
Nov. 29, 2019
Jane Eason edited this comment Nov. 29, 2019
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Jeff, what is warehousing?
Nov. 27, 2019
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That's the way the Double KO's were handled in the 70's, too. We always played at the club, and I had forgotten who sponsored it.
Nov. 24, 2019
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Alan, thanks for your input.

Does your club have fund raisers or social events such as parties, or free luncheons or dinners?

If so, do you schedule equally among the games, or choose a game that would get the biggest turnout or a game that needs help?

If not, how would you decide which game/s should hold such events?

(Alan, I just noticed that you are co-owner of Essex Bridge Center, the number 5 club in the nation by table count. My husband and I lived in Summit, NJ for six years in the 70's, and Essex Bridge Center was the wonderful club where we played many a double KO and pairs' game. Does Essex still have the double KO's?)
Nov. 24, 2019
Jane Eason edited this comment Nov. 24, 2019
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I like your idea, Kevin. Can this type game be run for advanced players?
Nov. 11, 2019
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Nor to me.
Nov. 10, 2019
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These lessons actually conflict with the game I run. But what a great idea for a limited game!!
Nov. 10, 2019
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Jeff, the same players could attend either.
Nov. 10, 2019
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I should have said the lessons are opposite the 199er game. They are separate and in another room. I run the Open and the 199er games, but they are not my games. They belong to the club.
Nov. 9, 2019
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The lessons do conflict with a 199er game.
Nov. 9, 2019
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How many of you run two games simultaneously? This is a policy at our club.
Oct. 23, 2019
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1.Fairly easy, as several players live near-by. However, I run an open and a limited game each session I direct, and I try to avoid filling in unless we have a very small game with a long sit-out. If each game has an odd number of pairs, pairs from both groups often volunteer to move to the other section in order to avoid sit outs.
2.No.
3.NA
4.Our club rotates directions monthly, a policy I do not like because it leaves directors with fewer options.
PS.A director at our club suggested we provide sit-out pairs with a set of hands to use for practicing bidding—a great idea in m opinion.
Oct. 23, 2019
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Diamond finesse for me, too.
Oct. 22, 2019
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I think part of the problem is that some of our beginning classes rush beginners through the basics and students come out of these classes with no idea there is a difference between opener and responder or between opening and overcalling.

They learn Stayman in one or two lessons and two weeks later, they learn to open a week two bid and in another couple of weeks, 2C, strong, artificial and forcing. And they get these two 2-C bids mixed up. To them, 2C is 2C whether they are opening, responding, or overcalling.

I think sticking with all natural bids in the first eight or so lessons would help them build a stronger foundation. No Stayman, no Blackwood, no transfers and no artificial 2C openers, until they understand the difference between opener and responder and until they learn to invite game and accept an invitation.

Just last week, two players in my 0-199 game had the following auction:

1C Pass 1NT All Pass.

And while waiting for the other tables to finish, they asked how they could have reached game with their 12 hcpts opposite 17.
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The 1C opener said she opened a short club (with Kxxxx AQx xx Kxx). Responder said she had then opened her 5-3-3-2 and 17 hcpts with 1NT.

Both have taken beginner lessons and one is now enrolled in a class where the students learn a convention a week. (They LOVE conventions.)
Oct. 22, 2019
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By the way, before our club moved to a new location, I probably played an average of once or twice a month and directed twice a week, two games each. But, since the move, we have lost a good portion of our membership, and our club needs lots of help to pay the rent, so my husband played 22 sessions in August and I played 16. And I've never enjoyed club bridge more.
Sept. 2, 2019
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