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All comments by Harald Berre Skjæran
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If he were on the list, my vote would go to Arne Hofstad of Norway. For most (all) of you he's a total stranger. The bridge journalists in the crowd who's been around for a long time will know him, though - he passed away ten years ago.

He won a string of bulletin prizes nationally and some at international championships. He was one of the founders of the Norwegian Bridge Press Association, and president for a period. He had his daily column in Adresseavisa (Trondheim) and a large weekly column (on Fridays) for 38 years. A lot of bridge players all over the country bought the Friday issue of Adresseavisa solely for the purpose of reading Arne's weekly column.

He had a great writing style, and was a true old school gentleman.

I remember best his Friday column covering the final deal of the Bermuda Bowl semifinal in Santiago 1993. Reading it, you litteraly felt you were there, in the viewgraph theatre, sitting alongside Arne and Jon Sveindal (sitting out), watching the deal sending Norway through to the final against the Netherlands.

I knew Arne pretty well, living in Trondheim from 1984 through 1991, playing with and against him occasionally at the rubber bridge club. And providing him with a few boards now and then.
Feb. 23
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Another possibility is to play declarer for AQx-KJT9xx-xxx-x/AQ-KJTxxxx-xxx-x or similar, and switch to the 10.

The comment above was just rubbish, mixup in my head.
Feb. 23
Harald Berre Skjæran edited this comment 16 hours ago
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It's pretty close between 1NT and 2NT in my book. No aces and a singleton heart would probably swing my decision to 1NT.
Feb. 23
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I've been playing serious 3NT for several years. But I've switched to the Brogeland-Lindqvist method; 3NT is a slam try without shortness, direct control bid shows shortness. This method is ambigous concerning strength; you can't distinguish a strong slam try from a mild one. But it makes it easier for partner to judge the fit.
Feb. 23
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Yes, it doesn't show any extra strength, just promises 4 spades and no other suitable bid. Could be 4333 without a heart stopper.
Feb. 22
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Most probably Jacob was either the TD at the table or consulted by the TD at the table.
Feb. 22
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Best bridge book ever - by far, IMO: Alan Sontag's “The Bridge Bum”, second best: Terence Reese's “The Expert Game” (“Master Play” in the US, I believe).

Best writer: Terence Reese.
Feb. 20
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Had to abstain, since none of the poll options qualifies as a correct option, because of the stupid qualifiers. The ruling is straightforward, though; just made.
Feb. 17
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High with two, low with three.
Feb. 16
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Never said it wasn’t. The non diamond switch lost the board, so gets the majority of the blame.
Feb. 15
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East has to get most of the blame. Not switching to a diamond is nuts.
Feb. 13
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MC: Your calculations is wrong.

You should compare each of the weighted scores with the other tables result and convert to IMPs for each score, and multiply each of the IMP scores with the corresponding weight.

You can't compute a fictional score and use that to get to the IMP score on the board.

This is a common fallacy when weighting scores.

At MP it's exactly the same: Compare each weighted score with the rest of the field to fint the correct MP for each score, and multiply with the weights.
Feb. 12
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That’s too late after his partner passed. The TD should reopen the auction, canselling west’s final pass after being called to the table, he can’t rewind the auction further.

He can still adjust the score based upon east having been misinformed (no alert, assuming a weak 3 is alertable) before passing.
Feb. 11
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Pretty sure Viking Precision Club (Grøtheim) would find out this.
Feb. 8
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Deleted - misread the OP.
Feb. 6
Harald Berre Skjæran edited this comment Feb. 6
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I don't know the EBU stop card regulations.

Did north remove the stop card at once after bidding 2, or after about ten seconds after bidding, as is the rule here in Norway?

If the latter, I don't understand why east didn't ask at once after the bid, before the stop card was removed.

If north removed the stop card at once, asking and waiting for 10-15 seconds before passing (as east did) is correct procedure, IMO.
Feb. 6
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Diamond to hand and heart finesse.
Feb. 4
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4 comes to mind.
Feb. 4
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In Norway we don't alert from the 4-level, except in the first round of bidding. Thus 4 would be alertable here if it was a transfer.
Jan. 31
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They are, in fact, required to reveal their revoke. Law 792 say that they can't accept the score for a trick they didn't win. It's impossible to accept the claim without knowing about the revoke, and thus they have to reveal it. That is, they can wait until they've taken their hand from the next board/moved to the next round, to avoid the revoke penalty. But the trump trick has to be scored as not lost by declarer.
Jan. 31
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