Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Esko Pikataival
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All suits break evenly from the perspective of the longest instance of the suit (EW):
spades 4-4
hearts 3-3
diamonds 3-3
clubs 3-3
May 22
Esko Pikataival edited this comment May 22
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EDITED heavily for too pessimistic initial analysis; morning jog woke up my brains :)

If you take a look at the Fredin hand, there is a perfectly legitimate and technical line to make it.

Win the club and duck a diamond. Win the (say) club return and ruff the club. Cash the A and the A.

At this point the hand is more or less a lock against normalish distributions.

If West ruffs he's either end-played or you can end-play East with a diamond later. If West follows, you continue with a diamond to end-play an opponent. If they play a minor to triple void, you just discard a spade. If East returns a major suit card end-play him with the third trump (You can always strip the spades with the top as an entry to hand).

There are (at least) two tail cases where the line above doesn't work:
a) if East can win two diamonds and push two spades thru and West has three trumps
b) if West has 6 spades and hearts are 2-2

You might be able to sniff out those cases and change tack in the midhand.

Anyway, Fredin went for the ruse, even though the technical line would have been pretty odds-on (and IMO even more probable than the elimination line in my problem hand).

In my problem, playing the Q costs nothing so it cannot be very expensive.

(The meta game related to showing the club length (2) is, of course, interesting. Would I do that with T singleton (ignorant or double bluff)? Would I do that with QT (single bluff or triple bluff)?)
May 5
Esko Pikataival edited this comment May 5
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The Only Chance by Eric Jannersten, Deal 43

Dealer South, love all

K3
97543
987
A97

A2
AKQJT
AK6
T62

1-(4)-p-(p)
X-(p)-5 ap

West leads the Q, dummy plays the K and East discards 8.
May 4
Esko Pikataival edited this comment May 4
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I wasn't discussing the merits of the calls but the justification you made to them. Below is a direct quote:

“My reasoning was that 2♠ could be made with zero points, but 3♣ or double would be free bids and would not be made on zero points.”

The statement above is wrong as the lower limit of 2 is not relevant.

The straw man you created from my comment to disagree with was not there. If you had read the comment to the end, you would have noticed that IMO there was no comparable call available.
April 28
Esko Pikataival edited this comment April 28
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Based on your reply above, you seem to confuse the sets and the subsets. Assume that the range of 2 is 0-13 hcp. If the range of X or 3 would be 7-13 hcp (or even 12-13 hcp) that range would be the subset of the 2 range.

See e.g. http://www.kolumbus.fi/memmu1/piv/bridge/comparable_call.png

Based on the system information given and deducted, I would say that there is no comparable call to 2 as 2 tends to show at least 2 card disparity in the majors (and often real shortness in hearts as responder prefers 3m to 2).
April 26
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Try https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Useful_space_principle

The idea of using transfers/swaps is not exactly new and is often referenced as USP according to the Jeff Rubens article.
April 10
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A long time ago I was playing against a pair, which currently isn't welcome to all tournaments viz. AZ and CB. My partner opened a weak NT and I used NF Stayman 2. AZ (my screenmate) doubled and partner redoubled to show clubs. After three passes AZ expecting me to be dummy showed his hand. I tried to look away while telling him that I'm the declarer. The response I got was “Please, don''t tell my partner I showed my hand; he'll kill me”.

Even double dummy, the QT987xx was enough for one down.
April 5
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Based on 7A3 you need the rule of 18 for 1st/2nd seat SUIT opening and 9hcp with 4432 or 4333 do not satisfy the rule of 18. 7A3 specifically seems to apply to suit openings and 1 is a suit opening even if it is NT surrogate.

Note that 7B1(i)c should state if NT strength requirement applies.
March 31
Esko Pikataival edited this comment March 31
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RR: AFAIU, I was not suggesting that 3 was the call to be made and if you read my comment just above, you would have noted that I bid 2 in the same position (I happened to play in the same tournament). I was trying to suggest what might have gone in her mind causing the auction to stop too early.

In my 2/1 version, 3 shows solid/semisolid suit.
March 12
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I think that many of us would be happy if she would call for a game. Sometimes things just don't go as planned; here she might have been a bit afraid of the trump quality after the 3 call and using the brakes at the wrong time caused the bidding to halt way too early. Their opponents bid 7 so getting to 6 would have cost 13 IMPs instead of 17.
March 12
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We bid this using 2/1 simply
1…2
2…3 (2 was either 6+ or 5 cards but not 2NT call)
4NT..5
5NT..7

After partner's 3, I sort of showed my cards by RKCB followed by 5NT and partner judged well. Our opponents were the other pair to stop in 4.

With the hand pair, I'd rather prefer West to RKCB :)
March 12
Esko Pikataival edited this comment March 12
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Psyching is legal. However, regular psyching in the same partnership creates a partnership understanding, which must be disclosed. In some jurisdictions certain partnership agreements are not allowed.

If EW are a regular psyching partnership, 1 response should be alerted and described along the lines what it has shown in its previous incarnations e.g. “might be three small as a lead inhibitor”.

In some jurisdictions that agreement might be banned.

Extract from Law 40C1: “Repeated deviations lead to implicit understandings which then form part of the partnership’s methods and must be disclosed in accordance with the regulations governing disclosure of system.”
March 9
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IMO, opener's normal options are pass and double. Opener can bid 5 with an exceptional hand with high offense and low defense e.g. no A and void.

Opener's double should indicate willingness to defend. Pass just tells that “you redoubled so follow up your plan whatever that was”.
March 7
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Based on your description in the initial post, your opponent was following the procedure as it is written. However, the correct procedure might result in UI. We have the laws to deal with UI but nothing in your post suggested that his partner had utilized the UI.

As you stated, it is forbidden to ask only for partner's benefit. The opening post displayed no evidence on that.
March 5
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Your opponent was correctly following the procedure set by the bridge laws.
March 5
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This is based on a problem by Martens (published in 1992 in Przeglad Brydzowy) and later on the same year published by Chip Martel in rec.games.bridge (referencing the source). The solution is neat but a bit counter intuitive.
March 5
Esko Pikataival edited this comment March 5
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My case and the committee decision took place in Europe, probably in the early 90's and the appeals committee decision was to adjust the score with the clarification that in a hesitation case like that the player must play the lower; in that case the card was a sure winner. The reason for hesitation was that going up would expose the 2nd honour to ruffing finesse but OTOH playing low might give declarer a surprise trick.

I'm not trying to judge the case here. I'm just bringing in the possible background for the director ruling.
Feb. 19
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I'm not an EBL/WBF director. However, a long time ago (I think it was European Pairs Championships) a player hesitated from 2nd hand in defense (for a bridge reason) with two touching honours whether to duck or go up (to win the trick). He went up with the higher and later the appeals committee decided that hesitation is ok but thereafter the player must play the lower.

AFAIK, the case above is a precedent from a high level European Appeals committee, even though on hesitation on defense.
Feb. 19
Esko Pikataival edited this comment Feb. 19
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Clyde Love's book is dry like the Linear Algebra book but IMO it's a good theory book and the exercises are ok even though poorly presented. I learned a lot from that.

It's not necessary to remember everything from the book; once the concepts are understood the rest can be worked out at the table. The concepts are also very necessary when defending.
Feb. 18
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Thanks. I added the half time score (+35) so if you re-read, you won't get surprised any more.

Four of the hands above were flat. The rest of them we won 56-51.
Feb. 13
Esko Pikataival edited this comment Feb. 13
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