Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Eric Sieg
1 2 3 4 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 35 36 37 38
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think we can look at our hand to determine the odds of a system forget. We have 5 hearts, LHO prefers hearts to diamonds, RHO has the reds and partner never bid, even over 2H? Sounds way more likely that E misbid, bid spades again, and we need to lead appropriately.

Even if there is an infraction, there's a director in our area that's notorious for never correcting situations like these because “we should have known something was going on”. No clue if they were involved in this particular event.
Feb. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'm not sure you get to complain about getting put in bracket 2 if you don't win it David :)
Feb. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think 1NT showing a strong balanced NT is normal. Just kidding :) Amusing how many missed the passed hand part….

I think forcing to the 2 level shows a more offensive hand with more shape. 5+ 5+ would be expected, although partner can do what they want. X would promise 4+ 4+ for me, although every once in a long while it might be 4 and 3 with the right hand.
Feb. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't think anyone in the “encouraging” camp thinks 3 is a rescue. It's meant to be constructive and forward going, but is also somewhat limited.
Feb. 7
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Think the answer also depends on partnership style and tendencies. In some partnerships, we overcall and balance more aggressively and try not to hang each other for doing so. In those, I would consider this constructive and suggests not passing but not strictly forcing. In more conservative partnerships, playing this as forcing makes more sense. So, my answer is actually a mixture of “forcing” and “encouraging”, depends on partnership.
Feb. 7
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When I first started playing bridge again ~4 years ago, I cared a lot about the power ratings. Going higher felt like a reasonable goal. However, I found that checking didn't really increase my enjoyment of the game. When trying a new partnership that didn't click or introducing a partner to a new system or getting a bad run of club games would sink my rating, it would bum me out.

I think some sort of rating system is 100% critical to bridge. We don't even have to invent a new one, and I don't understand the ACBL's obsession with trying. Masterpoints are awful, and seeding off of masterpoints is a disgrace.

However, it is a lot easier to feel progression with masterpoints. Heck, that initial run to lifemaster when you need specific points and are trying to pull it all together is exciting - whether it takes months or years. The problem with masterpoints is that it is a terrible method of seeding and that the appeal falls off after attaining LM significantly.

While I think using a rating is clearly superior, I also worry about the incentives issue. For example, in my experience the absolute worst thing I can do if I care about power rating is play at a weak club with a strong partner. The opponents do all sorts of haphazard things and you frequently don't control your own destiny. If those things go badly like they generally should and you get a score in the mid 60s, the power rating doesn't move. If its the day when leading unsupported aces, passing forcing bids, getting confused in the bidding and playing a part score with 28 hcps etc end up being correct and you get a 50 or 55, it tanks the rating horribly. I've looked at power rating as it is now, and when club games are eliminated and my power rating in tournaments with my main partner has consistently been significantly higher than when including all the club games. If rating now matters and I cared about maximizing it, I would stop playing club games and stick to BBO and big tournaments. However, that doesn't sound like a good thing for the ACBL.

So, improving seeding while being careful of incentives is interesting. Supposedly the NGS works great, so maybe we can just copy that. Or maybe rating is hidden and we let computers do their magic behind the scenes to spit out brackets. Who knows.

The main thing I know is that masterpoints are a terrible seeding system and any attempt at a rating system will do a much better job.
Feb. 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If LHO has 6 spades and 4 clubs, spade back now (I ducked, don't think it matters) is only way to hold it. Don't think it matters hugely which one. If LHO has 7 spades, we aren't beating it. Sure wish partner led a spade, then its down 2.
Jan. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Official rule in notes is that if suit is agreed and we can't bid RKC because we are too high (usually opponents bidding), then 5NT is GSF. I've wanted to bid GSF one time in my life, and it was in a bidding contest and it helped us get to the right spot. However, the number of times less regular partners have just decided that a 5NT meant as pick a slam should be GSF is several times that. I could happily give up GSF in all circumstances (and have with various partners) and not feel like I was missing out on anything at all.
Jan. 27
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yeah, in retrospect I think 4 is the right bid. I didn't think of it when first talking about the hand, but involves partner in the decision instead of just guessing.
Jan. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think people are avoiding 4 because there's no guarantee partner has 4 spades here. They could be something like 3424, or maybe 3523 with minimal values. I definitely don't think its unlikely that partner has 3 spades, 3 eats up space so there are a variety of hands partner might where they might feel X is the best bid even though they don't have 4 spades.
Jan. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
And different than our table, where it went: 1H (2D) 4C* P 4H (5D) all pass, down 1. (4C was a fit jump, altho a bit offshape with 3 hearts and 7 clubs).
Jan. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'll certainly do the math, and I expect teammates to do the same. That said, if the math is remotely close, I'll error on the side of safety if there's a big swing involved because of the intangible negatives associated with being wrong.
Jan. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The tiny bit of snow that was on the ground in KC is not the same as what people fear from MN. During that “snow” in KC, I was playing tennis outside with a friend.
Dec. 22, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Funny, I was briefly tempted by 1 more than 4. But then chickened out :)
Dec. 17, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Are Canasta and Mah Jong profitable? I also wonder about Go, although that's pretty cheap to play at Go centers in Seattle ($35 for a 10 visit card).

Are selling other things practical? Like bridge books? Or is the hassle too high for the potential $ involved?
Dec. 17, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Here's a link to a Seattle example, for those who aren't familiar with the sorts of locations Jeff refers to: https://www.moxboardinghouse.com/ . They have a large dining area with well over 100 games available to play for free that usually has 60+ people eating/drinking. Then they have private event rooms that are rented out for private parties/larger games (buying food/drink throughout). And then a large tournament space which hosts board game/card game tournaments or just casual play if the dining area is full, and people are usually buying food and drink throughout from there as well. Thursday and Friday nights are especially popular, with MTG tournaments pulling in 100-140ish people in the tournament space alone.

While their original business model was that of a board game store, I suspect that these days 90% of their profit is off of food and drink and they are essentially a restaurant for nerds that happens to also sell board games while providing space for people to eat/drink/play/have fun/etc.

I have no clue if something closer to this model could succeed in bridge, but it definitely seems interesting.
Dec. 16, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Peg: I was talking about clubs, specifically physical sites that are dedicated to bridge, in the context of what Jeff mentioned about board game clubs that are popping up and becoming more popular. There are many such places in Seattle, copying a model started by Cafe Mox, and spread to Mox Boarding House and other locations. People head there for the evening and play board games while also buying food and drink and socializing with friends.

I like the ideas of making tournaments more popular as well, but I don't think this particular conversation thread is terribly applicable to tournaments. There, the site usually benefits from overpriced food rather than the (struggling?) bridge club owner.

Also, I think tournaments are targeting a different audience. We need to suck people in, teach them the game, get them having fun and pulling other people in before they care about multiple day tournaments with multiple sessions of bridge.
Dec. 16, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I know, and not every board game venue serves alcohol. Almost everyone tries to have some sort of food. It doubles as extra income, people MIGHT buy board games but they usually buy food and drink and not complain if the price isn't the most competitive if it's decent. It's funny, bridge is the exact opposite: food is usually included in the entry fee for some hospitality and then some clubs strive to provide better, up to and including lunch or dinner. I might not understand the demographics/income stream/etc stuff well enough, but I wonder if food as its own source of profit rather than discounted/free to make the game more appealing would help club owners stay more solvent.
Dec. 16, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Hi Jeff. I agree that the people playing the Euro board games and board game tournaments are the perfect target. Most of these people are those that would love bridge given the right environment and a opportunity to learn! However, I think its really tough to make the leap. For the board game experience you go and play games with people you know or would like to know, close to your own age, drink alcohol (or other stuff, depending on venue), and have a good time. The learning curve is low enough that its very easy for people who are new to start playing. They'll be bad at first but they'll have fun and get better.

In comparison, bridge in most places is a crowd of people not like them. Average age is probably north of 60 most places, not much in the way of food/alcohol, and its hard to pick up. If you didn't play other card games as a kid (less common nowadays), it's even harder.

People like to blame video games, lack of attention span, etc on why people don't play bridge but I think a fun environment with people your own age is the biggest barrier. Most board game nights run as long or longer than an average bridge session and some games (twilight imperium anyone?) can take two days to finish.

I do think one interesting idea I haven't seen tried much yet is physical “own the space” bridge clubs utilizing their space at night to turn into a board game spot. They probably need better food, maybe alcohol, etc but bridge players might appreciate that too.

No board game offers the depth that bridge does, and there are lots of board game players out there that would appreciate that depth. Sparking their interest and then providing an environment that they enjoy while they start their journey are two pretty big challenges. I loved bridge and was hooked, and STILL stepped away from the game for 7ish years and a big part of that was the “nobody my own age playing” issue.
Dec. 16, 2019
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I feel like people that insist there are too many regionals have a local bias in that perspective. In Seattle, we have 1 regional within a 2 hour drive per year. If willing to drive 3 hours, in 2019 that increases the available regionals to 2, the other of which isn't even in our district. Increasing it to 5 hours adds a couple more regionals, but that's a pretty hefty drive.

I'm sure in some areas there are so many regionals that they might feel common, but I don't think that's universal across the ACBL.
Dec. 16, 2019
1 2 3 4 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 35 36 37 38
.

Bottom Home Top