Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Doug Bennion
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Thanks. Except for the memory load, I like it.
Aug. 9, 2014
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We play a wide-range (10-16 or so) Flannery with 5 or 6 hearts, so we use different responses to our 2NT enquiry, along the lines of the Ogust responses to a weak 2-bid. It might be dumb but it seems to work OK for us because we like including those 46xx holdings. 2 2NT, then

3 = bad hand, 5 hearts
3 = bad hand, 6 hearts
3 = good hand, 5 hearts
3 = good hand, 6 hearts
3NT = good hand, 4=5=2=2 stoppered

2 then 3m = stopper ask, 3M = slammish.
Aug. 9, 2014
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Hi Fred

The Android app is awesome for both playing and viewing on a tablet. It is also awesome for viewing on a phone. It isn't awesome for playing on a phone, but then nothing would be.

I used the older version for viewing on a phone, but don't recall it being awesomer than the Android version, for that purpose. Can't imagine anyone with Android or iOS needing the older version unless they were not aware of the new apps.
Aug. 4, 2014
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If there was a “deal setup” routine within BBO, it would only take a couple of minutes to key in a hand. Then the commentator would have lots of time to catch up to the real-time bidding/play. I wouldn't mind watching a BBO broadcast that was delayed by a couple of minutes.
Aug. 4, 2014
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Yes there are, but Android doesn't support Flash, which apparently is a big deal. The BBO browser version doesn't work on Android, for example. BBO does have a dandy mobile app for both Android and Apple.

Also I think you must download and install some Windows thing from OurGame, which is a no-go on an Android platform.
Aug. 2, 2014
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Despite their “assurances” it will be viewable on a browser, I see no mention of a version for Android tablets and phones, dammit.
Aug. 1, 2014
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I've only seen it used in direct position. I'm sure we discussed its use in balancing but cannot recall off the top of my head, why we chose not to …
June 18, 2014
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I use it over pre-empts only, and that works for me. Over 1-level bids, I use Raptor 1NT. Over 1m openers Raptor shows 5-6 of the other m, plus a 4-card M. Over 1M openers it shows a 5-6 card m, plus 4 of the other M.

Of course then you have to find something to do with those pesky balanced 15-17 hands. For those usually you can find a slightly off-shape X, a 5-card overcall, a chunky 4-card overcall. I'm happy to pay that price.
June 18, 2014
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Yes, kind of, but it depends on the suits that have been bid, and how many. You're right with that auction.

After (1) 1 (2) (again overcaller should try to not have four hearts) then:

X =
2 =
2 = good raise
2 = junk

When three suits have been bid, say (1) 1 (2) then:

X = = cue equivalent
2 =
2 = good raise
2 = junk

That's kind of Transfer Snapdragon

Also works as a Transfer Support X, where ‘good’ raise is four trumps, and ‘not so good’ is three trumps.

And random auctions like ohhh (1) 1 (P) P /(2); then

X = cuebid
2 =
2 = very good rebid
2 = ‘normal’ rebid
May 29, 2014
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Play transfers there, starting with Double. Also helps to play Raptor 1NT overcall, so the 2 overcall denies four spades.

X = (rebiddable, or with tolerance)
2 =
2NT = natural
3 = nice raise (discuss with partner)
3 = junk raise
May 29, 2014
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Toronto clubs allow us (and a growing number of other pairs) to use transfer responses to the balanced 1C opener you describe. In playing them for a number of years, we've had precisely one complaint, that from a litigious sort who knew full well how to handle them but didn't think it fair we could use them but he could not (or so he thought). He had just assumed the club game permitted GCC conventions only.
May 28, 2014
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Thanks Steve. Love the ability to transfer to the unbid suits. Possibly losing those 4=4 heart fits is scary. Might be interesting if the transfer to hearts was 4+. You'd lose some 5=3 fits (finding some later), and possibly play in a few too many Moysians.

You also play those transfers after 1D (2C)?
April 29, 2014
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Steve, in your given example 1D (1S), when you drop negative doubles to play transfers, does your 2D transfer to hearts promise five, or just four? If five, you must miss some four-four heart fits but find that the transfer advantages ultimately win out? Transfers would sure help to relieve my partner's discomfort with negative free bids …

Thsnks.
April 29, 2014
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Haven't yet met a director who hasn't told us to have a written defense. Is a pre-alert required? We'd do it out of courtesy regardless.

I agree the 1D and 1H ‘defenses’ should be obvious (although there are variations and options, like what does 2D show over the 1D response … is it stronger or weaker than Dbl, or something else completely?), but it's not so clear with the 1S response … we use it simply as ‘no majors’ and suggest they double with majors but I'm not sure that's optimum.

April 18, 2014
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Off-specific-topic but analagous, although transfer responses to 1C are permitted by Mid chart, there is not (natch) an official written defence. (Is it interesting that all of the official defenses relate to opening bids and not calls in other positions?)
April 17, 2014
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For what it’s worth to anybody, I’ve cobbled together the approximate frequency of IQ openers of various ranges, when 15-17 is baselined at 100. For example, for every 100 notrump openers in the 15-17 range, there will be 293 in the 11-14 range.


16-18 72
15-18 116
15-17 100
14-17 156
14-16 133
13-15 169
12-15 248
12-14 195
11-14 293
11-13 236
10-13 330
10-12 261
Dec. 26, 2013
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Don’t your classifications ignore frequency, and shouldn’t that be factored? Ummmm for example, playing strong notrumps, when you have a 13-pt balanced hand, you make it much easier for the opps to enter the auction accurately, than if you opened it 1NT. And you have balanced minimums much more often than you will have balanced 15-17.

It’s easy to pick at this advantage or that disadvantage, without looking at the entire picture. The only sure way to test the efficacy of 11-14 say, versus 15-17, is to play them both for a dozen or so sessions, and track your results, making sure you also track what happens when you open balanced 1m, because those 1m openers are the other side of the same coin.
Dec. 21, 2013
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I don’t like that scenario either. But your analysis doesn’t account for the good stuff that happens when you open a 13-pt 1NT, and your opps cannot find their M fit, whereas the strong notrumpers opened it 1C, and their opps did find their M fit. 11-14 arises 3X the frequency of 15-17, so that bad scenario happens much more often to strong notrumpers.

The -200 just doesn’t happen very often. If responder is balanced and weak, the opps (not knowing that) usually get active and stumble about trying to find a partial, and rescue us.
Dec. 21, 2013
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Passed hand is looking for the best partial. He passes with balanced hands. With unbalanced hands, single-suited or 54xx or more skewed:

2 = both majors
2 = any single-suited hand, puppet to 2, P/C
2M = 4M5m
2NT = mm better diamonds
3 = mm better clubs

I like to use the same general counter to the Capp 1-suiter 2 (Dbl = MM), and the DONT Dbl.
Dec. 20, 2013
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I prefer to play 11-14, which occurs 40% more often than 12-14, and about 3X as often as 15-17. About 35% of our openers are 1NT (we include some 5422, and all 5332). You do need good methods to cope with the interference they will throw at you … in my neck of the woods most players play Capp against us, and we relish that.

The weak notrump does inject more volatility into your results, but by and large it is good volatility. Sure you will sometimes miss a nice 4-4 major suit partial (or even some 5-4 fits), but your opps will miss more of them. As someone once said, you become a pain in the behind for three other players, but only one is your partner.

If you do play 11-14, and open almost all 11-counts with something, that means when you open 1NT in 3rd or 4th position, you are very unlikely to be in game range, and you should tailor your responses to finding the best partial … we play a completely different system when responder is a passed hand.
Dec. 20, 2013
Doug Bennion edited this comment Dec. 20, 2013
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