Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Doug Bennion
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I quite like 11-14, although I concede you need a smart responding system to handle the range. I get to open 1NT ~30% more often.
Aug. 27, 2015
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It's an excellent treatment if you put all of your balanced hands into 1, that are outside your notrump range. That includes any 5332 hand, and even some 5422. The corollary is all of your 1M openers are unbalanced, and 1 is usually 5+ and unbalanced. Oh and use transfer responses to 1.
Aug. 27, 2015
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I agree whole-heartedly. I love preempting that dumb 2C 1-suiter bid. And 2D is a terrible bid to use for MM; 2C much better.
Aug. 27, 2015
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FS, if on the up and up, apparently are better leaders than their peers.

In an expert field comprising 75K deals, Richard Pavlicek shows the opening lead costs the defence something in the range of 0.23 tricks. That is an all-contract average; the cost is a little higher for notrump contracts and a little lower for suit contracts. We arrive at that value by comparing the difference between 52-card double dummy results (double dummy leads), and 51-card results (eliminates the DD lead factor). It would be interesting what the IMP difference would be (leads against games and slams being more crucial), and what the range is, if any, between the best and worst expert leaders.

Then it would be most interesting to see where FS leads lie on that spectrum, over their body of work. Are their leads over-the-top great? Are both F and S great leaders? And if so, how likely is it that the two best leaders in bridge, find one another in a partnership?

http://www.rpbridge.net/9x29.htm
Aug. 27, 2015
Doug Bennion edited this comment Aug. 27, 2015
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You're right. If Meckwell is playing in the same direction in the same matchpoint game, I bid 3NT. Otherwise I pass.
Aug. 26, 2015
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Eugene I hope you increase your ‘flag number’ commensurate with your rapidly? increasing membership :-)
Aug. 26, 2015
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If you played negative free bids through 3, which is how I learned them, you'd have no problem. This particular hand.
Aug. 26, 2015
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Mike recalled the diamond suit as AKJxxx, maybe AKQxxx, to which he added a diamond, and subtracted the spade J from Jx, if I'm reading things right. Especially after gaining a spot, upgrading AKQxxxx to 10 is looking hard not to do.
Aug. 26, 2015
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Schwartz led a small club. Vugraph commentator wrote ‘interesting lead’.
Aug. 25, 2015
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Jxx doesn't carry its weight, neither does KJ doubleton. At matchpoints I just go for the plus. Close though. The KnR is 9.20.
Aug. 25, 2015
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I've played them for years in local clubs, with zero issues. Just FYI the methods I would use if we played ourselves is this: over the 1 (= hearts) response, X = takeout of hearts, and suit bids are all transfers, beginning with 1 = spades, etc.
Aug. 20, 2015
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Mark: Pairs who play transfers there (I do) would consider that a perfect 2 holding. I alert it as ‘constructive’ rather than ‘goldilocks’. A direct 2 raise can be very light (that hand subtract the ace), and should be alerted as such.
Aug. 17, 2015
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I'm not sure exactly what you mean with your ‘take out doubles’ question. Can you give me an example?

I'm sure Sabine/Wellands methods are far sexier and wayyyy more successful. Yes knowledge that partner is unbalanced, reverberates through everything, including your bidding judgement and decisions, your defence, your system, and occasionally even your leads. We probably don't take advantage as much as we should.

As I mentioned previously we've been able to incorporate transfer rebids by opener into our forcing 1NT routine, which neatly allows opener to easily distinguish between minimum/good/great holdings. I could elaborate on that if there is any interest, although I'm very sure it isn't optimal. We've also significantly modified our 2NT raise, since opener will always have a nice playing hand and usually has shortness (I think of opener as having a superb dummy for a 4-card major opener). By putting all out-of-range balanced hands into 2+ 1, you pretty much lose the club suit, at least until the rebid, but you really sharpen up your other openers, 1 being 4+ unbalanced and usually 5+, 1M containing no 5332 hands. We play 11-14 1NT, so play transfer responses to 1 to rightside M and notrump contracts when opener is 15+ balanced. 5422 hands are sometimes ‘balanced’ sometimes not (4=5=2=2 we use Flannery, 5=4=2=2 we open 1 having an easy rebid, 5m4M22 are ‘balanced’, 5M4m22 usually opened 1M).
Aug. 6, 2015
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I never open 1M with 5332 unless 18-19 (open them 1NT or 1 out of range). Knowing 1M is always ‘unbalanced’ is a big help in some auctions, and permits transfer rebids by opener after 1M - 1NT.
Aug. 5, 2015
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Alan: Yes good idea. For the 3 invitational version you can't pull up in 2, but otherwise nice.

And if the overcall is (2), your ‘takeout’ bid is 3 (3 used for heart transfer), so you can't land in a 3 contract.
July 27, 2015
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Frances:

It's trivial to construct hands that would benefit from other methods. In the cases you cite, a negative double would obviously be nice to have. Other times, you'd be wishing your negative double was a penalty double, or just maybe could be used as a transfer. The trick is to optimize what you play, maybe you think you have.

In my experience playing negative doubles, the ideal hands rarely arose. And when they did arise, partner rarely had the nice ideal fit and we ended up in 2M-Moysians and worse, 3m-Moysians when the opp's contract wasn't making. And when responder in some frustration at not being dealt an ideal hand, decides to double with a less-than-ideal hand, the results are worse. They aren't for me, but hey if you love them ..

In the first example, yes you would pull up in 2NT and possibly miss a spade fit.

In the second yes you would pass. However opener is encouraged to liberally balance in that position.
July 27, 2015
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For what it is worth, the south hand has a K&R value of 16.70.
July 22, 2015
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To the best of my knowledge, all the written defences in the ACBL database apply to opening bids. The immense ‘difficulty’ with transfer responses to 1 is responder's bid, so any requirement for a written defence would be precedent setting. We do provide one if asked, as a courtesy.
July 18, 2015
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I like the transfer idea, although you will lose some 4=4 spade fits I guess (fewer here if you play Flannery). Any reason you don't use a ‘normal’ transfer-suit sequence?

X = normal heart raise
3 = spades
3 = clubs
July 18, 2015
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One way to reduce the range of that 3 bid is to play transfers in those positions, at the cost of whatever you now use XX for. So after (1) 2 (X), then XX = diamonds, 2 = ‘cue’ raise, 2 = spades, 2 = quality club raise, 3 = junk.
July 6, 2015
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