Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Levin
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 161 162 163 164
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Couldn't West hold something like Kxx Axx J KJxxxx, in which case ducking Trick 1 in Dummy and winning in the closed hand allows East to sandwich a spade lead between the two diamond entries?
4 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I agree with DB. Why wouldn't a declarer who thought that Dummy was on lead have simply called for one of Dummy's clubs instead of announcing the intent to take a club finesse?
6 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As noted above by Kit, this line would squeeze Dummy on the third round of spades.
23 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If West has Qx(x)(x)(x)(x) and started with either three or four spades (and I correctly guess which), then it's a lock: first spade taken, diamond toward the jack, diamond to the king, diamond toward the ten, diamond ace (pitching a heart), two more spades, and either spade exit (if West started with three spades) or heart toward the nine (if West started with four spades).

Added: Cross-posted with Steve Moese's comment.
March 17
David Levin edited this comment March 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Page 5, last paragraph: “Decarer” -> “Declarer”.
March 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'm not sure what layout this line is aimed at. For example, with 4=3=4=2, North can discard a heart on the Q.
March 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Hi, Steven. I refrained from commenting further because I still haven't firmly decided whether South's opening lead seems more likely from MUD or from three to the Q, although thinking along lines similar to Kit's had me still probably attacking trumps the same way as in my discussion-starter. (If the opening lead was from a doubleton, I would have expected South to lead a diamond at Trick 4, rather than the J.)

Added: It dawns on me that you were referring to the trump suit, in which case I am playing the ace if South follows with the nine or ten on the second round.
March 15
David Levin edited this comment March 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
South appears to have led from Q96. After the play as given, I cash the K and lead toward the 8, which holds my trump losers to one if South started with QT72 or Q972. Later, I'll lead toward the T for the additional heart pitch on the K.
March 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If in addition to having weak hearts, North lacked first-round control of two side suits, I think 4 would have been an overbid. This suggests that South should drive to slam over 4.
March 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jim, I look forward to hearing how it goes. Also, I recall that Nicholas France planned to do some computer-bridge programming also, in case you might want to share ideas.
March 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well, I'll agree that those rebels Shakespeare and Johnson were onto something. The suggested usage of either/neither seems to address a problem, without creating other problems. I'm not ready to adopt it, but I accept others' doing so.
March 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think so, even though it doesn't appear to be a poll option.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think that the opening lead against 6 would depend on the auction. If N/S don't show a spade fit, then when West holds Axx, trying to set up a winner before the A is dislodged might well appear more promising than trying to give Partner a spade ruff.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I probably would have bid 4 over 3. South's 2 bid improves North's hand tremendously.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Alan, I have to disagree: “either” takes only two alternatives.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In your suggested sequence, would 4 set diamonds as trumps or imply only that there is a minor-suit fit?
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If 4 (over 3) doesn't show spade support, then West is in a quandary that would have been avoided by bidding 2 (over 2).

If 4 does show spade support, then West can see enough strength and controls for driving to slam.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ray, there's actually no book. (For one thing, who would buy it?) I'm just posting ideas as I develop them.

If like you, many readers are bamboozled, I'm not sure know how to address that unless I receive questions, whether by comment or by private message.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
South's hand might even be a ross.
March 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“Funny, I would think the rejection is a result of having a slew of hearts and not much in the way of high cards.”

Martin, I agree this is quite possible. But I'm not sure it weakens the argument that East's rejection doesn't really give South reason to place long clubs with North.
March 10
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 161 162 163 164
.

Bottom Home Top