Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Goldfarb
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In my opinion, no. As I stated above, I was just trying to liven things up a little. I would encourage you to change your abstention to a vote, then make a comment saying “The poll choice said <x> but I disagree with the reasons given: here's what I think it should have said.”
Oct. 10
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Well, I was trying to be a bit less dry than just “100% N, 75% N, etc.” I tried to be also sufficiently vague as not to impose actual opinions on anyone. Evidently I didn't succeed for everyone.

I am curious to know what you would have voted if it had been the dry list.
Oct. 10
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At double-dummy you lose only two tricks: you can afford to ruff the third round of spades high, and then finesse in trumps.
Oct. 8
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I once had an auction where 2H showed spades, partner doubled as takeout of hearts, and then made a penalty double of spades.
Oct. 7
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Not if partner passes 4, you don't.
Oct. 5
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I actually held J6 QJ964 KQ8 Q96. Perhaps I should just have raised spades, but I thought partner could hold something like AKxxx Axx Axx xx, when a 5-3 fit would surely be better than the 5-2. I thought 4 was obvious on his actual hand.

Frankly, I don't understand pass at all: if South has a heart suit playable at the 4-level with Ax as support, wouldn't South have bid something at his first turn instead of passing?

To one comment in particular: yes, I think that x KQTxx Axxx xxx passes 3 and hopes for the best.
Oct. 4
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Steven Mcgrahan: I've seen a lot of people bid that way, but I am still waiting for one of them to miss a slam.
Sept. 17
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I have in fact heard people claim that Precision 1M bids are alertable.
Sept. 17
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I remember once I was in a competitive auction where we were bidding spades and they were bidding hearts. Partner bid 4NT RKC. I responded showing two key cards without the queen. Ah, too bad, thought partner, We're missing a key and the Q, so slam is not a good bet… Pass.

I managed to scramble four tricks with our various aces and kings, down 7 โ€“ thankfully not vulnerable, and needless to say not doubled.

At the other table, our opposite numbers sold out to 4 and allowed it to make! You know you're having a good round when you win imps on a result like that! (In fact getting a double game swing would not have brought us any more victory points.)
Sept. 13
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Law 45.4(b) says, in the latest version of the laws:
Declarer may correct an unintended designation of a card from dummy until he next plays a card from either his own hand or from dummy. A change of designation may be allowed after a slip of the tongue, but not after a loss of concentration or a reconsideration of action.

In other words, you can correct a slip of the tongue, but you can't change your mind. For example, I can remember once, having unblocked the AK of clubs from hand, I crossed to dummy (which had Qxxx left) and said “club”, then without pause for thought said "club queen". The opponents wanted to enforce the first call and make me play a low club, but the director ruled in my favor.

TL;DR: Yes, you could have corrected your slip of the tongue if you were fast enough. Your case wasn't as clear-cut as mine, so you might have wound up arguing with the opponents.
Sept. 11
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Ah, I'm sorry to hear that. I remember teaming up with you two a bunch of times back in the ‘90s. I’ll pass this along to Don V.
Sept. 11
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it isn't likely to matter, but you should win the opening lead with the king of spades, not the queen. This may leave West in doubt as to the location of the queen of spades.
Missing the queen, though, mightn't you try putting in the jack at trick 1? So West is not very likely to have much doubt.
Sept. 9
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No. Correct procedure here would have been to play the hand out at 5S-X, and adjust the score if N-S still felt damaged, which of course they wouldn't.
Sept. 7
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Kevin: if you're ever at a tournament I'm at, I'll be happy to let you tether to my iPhone.

(N.B.: Kevin and I are both in Texas, so this is not an idle offer.)
Sept. 7
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If you had opened 1NT, you probably would have played 2H, which isn't terrible.

My own preference is for 1NT 12-14, opening 5-card majors freely. This allows for 1NT 100% forcing, because the hands that would have passed 1NT semiforcing are removed from the 1M bid. Things are different at the top levels of course: if you open many 10's and most 11's, different problems arise. (My partnerships just pass.)
Sept. 2
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It's not clear to me that West's X is or should be “100% penalty”. West showed about 7-10 with the 1NT call, and East knows from his own hand that West can't have a trump stack. The X should indicate a maximum 1NT bid; defending the 8-card fit at the 2-level is almost never going to be right. East should look for his side's 8-card fit.
Aug. 28
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I think East should take out the double to 2NT, which ought to be pick-a-minor โ€“ any hand which would actually want to play 2NT would instead leave in the double.
Aug. 28
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I held xx QTxxxxx Kx Kx. The club ace was over the king, but 6 would still have had two losers in the pointed suits. At the other table our teammates sold out to 5, and took the obvious three tricks.
Aug. 22
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I was just looking up this hand to show someone, and I note two things:

1) According to Lazard himself, as reported in Tops and Bottoms, by the Granovetters, East hitched before passing 1. Lazard therefore pictured him with some spade length to go with his long clubs (Lazard knew that this East was in the habit of psyching his longest suit) and known heart length. That helped him picture partner with long diamonds.

2) The Westside Bridge Academy club in Houston has established a lending library. Somehow they have a hardcover volume that collects a year of The Bridge World โ€“ a hardcover book, typeset, not magazine issues bound together. So I took it out. Well, in there is a letter with this hand. The correspondent says that Lazard made “an inferential bid” of 6, and Moyse footnoted saying This is one of the most transcendentally inferential bids to cross our desk in many months. (This is where the word “transcendental” used by Philip Martin above originates.)

Anyway, the year in question was 1953. So the hand was not played in 1954, but either in 1953 or late 1952.
Aug. 18
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Advancer couldn't jump at her first turn. Now she thinks we're getting rich defending 2? I think it makes more sense to define the double as showing a maximum non-jump, and desire to compete further. (Maybe advancer has 4 5, and is looking to play in a 4-4 spade fit instead of 5-3 hearts? 4=4 majors doesn't make sense, as advancer would bid 1 on that hand and then 2 now.)
Aug. 9
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