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All comments by Christopher Monsour
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I'll grant it's better than Multi but they both suffer the defect of not shutting out 2 when you have a two-level spade preempt.
Jan. 21
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And presumably opener should correct clubs to diamonds with a five-card discrepancy (e.g., 4261) and usually with a four-card discrepancy (4162), but not with a three-card discrepancy (4252).
Jan. 21
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That is to say, you need to be willing to use it for hands you would otherwise pass, rather than for hands you would otherwise bid 3 with.
Jan. 20
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Page 3. “1NT is your only real shot at a plus score”. That statement is flat wrong. It may well be you *best* shot at a plus score, but 2 of either minor is certainly a *real* shot at a plus score. In fact, unless partner is 4243, one of them is very likely to be the best contract (and 2 may be fine opposite 4243), so you just have to get a 50/50 guess right. I think we can all agree that's a real shot.
Jan. 20
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Weak two is my favorite of the methods listed, but strong and artificial is very useful at IMPs, and 11-16 points with 4 hearts and 0-1 spade has a lot to be said for it. If you play canape, a minor two-suiter with opening values can be useful, as can 4-5 hearts, 5 spades with opening values.
Jan. 19
Christopher Monsour edited this comment Jan. 20
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I think he needs more than an 8 count when we are looking at all the aces outside of spades plus the K.

An 8 count double looks like x Axxx Axxxx xxx.
Jan. 17
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North has five spades and a diamond stiff when he might have doubletons in both those suits. If South has the substantial extra high cards that double implies, and East the distributional weirdness his bidding implies, North needs to be worried that both sides can make 5.
Jan. 15
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Good point, not that it helps on this hand. You're still screwed by a now completely legit 5 by RHO.
Jan. 13
Christopher Monsour edited this comment Jan. 13
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I like Robson's method here. If you want to invite 5 over 4, bid 3NT, not 4.
Jan. 13
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Double was bad. Pass was worse. 3 and 5 were also awful. And I'm not fond of 4 either. 3 and 4 are the only calls I would have chosen.

Actually, if you are in a force, double is fine. Are you in a force? I don't think you should be. After all, 4 is not exactly the best call ever if he thinks 4 is rolling, and the undisciplined 5 suggests bad things for your side on defense, too.

Note the utility of a Robson 3NT. If LHO had instead bid 3NT, inviting 5, now you're screwed for sure, as 5 by RHO becomes clear, rather than a lucky guess (and now pass by you really is forcing).
Jan. 13
Christopher Monsour edited this comment Jan. 13
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Or you could actually read Nicolas's comment containing the 0.03% statistic. It seems clear from context that he was talking about actual contracts (and also clear from context that he wasn't distinguishing undoubled, doubled, and redoubled). But by all means lecture him on what he should have posted statistics about.
Jan. 10
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Dale, in the relay system I play, we have a sequence in which an unlimited teller can strongly suggest slam with a 4NT bid after asker has attempted to sign off, and asker's options are to (a) bid a slam (small or grand, but usually small given the context); (b) bid a suit at the five-level to investigate a grand; or © bid 5NT, which is not to play but is non-forcing, with absolute dreck in contect.

But, of course, the relay system is designed so that such an inconvenient sequence is unlikely to happen in the first place. So this is much less likely than the pre-Kantar Blackwood escape.

I do agree that most people would assume 5NT is always forcing except when it was explicitly agreed not to be, or when it was redoubled. I wonder whether 5NTXX is more common than 5NT?
Jan. 10
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That was a typo. Tiny phone keyboard, tiny phone screen…. Fixed now that I am in front of a real keyboard.
Jan. 10
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I'm shocked it's that common. After all, there are 35 possible contracts not counting doubled and redoubled as distinct (then there would be 105, but rare contracts redoubled would be the rarest). So this says 5NT is only 100x times less likely than average. I would have thought it was more like 1000x less likely than average. To put in another way, if you play a session of bridge every day, thus says you will see 2 or 3 5NT contracts at your table each year. I would have thought 2 or 3 each decade.
Jan. 10
Christopher Monsour edited this comment Jan. 10
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I believe you mean “number of auctions” not “number of bids”.
Jan. 10
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I doubt it. But we're not all atheists here, thanks.
Jan. 10
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Playing in the last day of the LM pairs, with screens (RHO is my screenmate), LHO opens 1-Pass-Pass, 2 by me. The tray comes back with 3 by LHO and 3 by partner. RHO (Bramley, if I remember right) tanks, tanks, bids 6. I pass and push the tray under the screen, dead silence for a beat and then the loudest “J—s Ch—t” I have ever heard.
Jan. 9
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ACBL can't have a policy on age-related medical decline. Bridge prevents that, don't you know?
Jan. 9
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My favorite auction probably has been duplicated a few times. It was very profitable in the Blue Ribbon pairs in Las Vegas in 2001:

Pass-Pass-1-2
Dbl-Rdbl-Pass-Pass

I was dealer and now asked for an explanation of the redouble. It was explained as “he doesn't think you can make anything”. Holding Axx Axxxx xx J109 I had to stop myself from saying “he's perceptive” as I made the final pass. He was quite right. 2XX off 2 was our last plus score available.
Jan. 9
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I guess I should also admit an odd auction on an odd hand at Birmingham nationals in the fall of 2000. The opponents doubled us for penalties in four of a major, and we ran all the way to six notrump, which I made on a finesse and a pseudo double squeeze. (The client discarded from something like a tripleton 8 that he could have held on to to stop the squeeze on the line I took, because my threat in that suit against his partner was a 7.)
Jan. 9
Christopher Monsour edited this comment Jan. 9
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