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All comments by Christopher Monsour
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The ACBL suspends people for ridiculous reasons. Many other mind-sports (e.g., chess) allow people to withdraw from tournaments more or less at any time for any reason. I knew chess players who had started playing bridge who got suspended for withdrawing from a regional KO after winning the semifinal. (They hadn't expected to get that far, and one of them had an important function to attend that conflicted with the final.) Why do we have to peg ourselves as the game whose players are less adept at social graces than chess players?
April 11, 2016
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Of course it should include the interests of LGBT bridge players, _qua_ bridge players–not other of their (nor of other bridge players') others interests. It's good the ACBL has the policies that it has.

It's a bad idea to lobby the governor to veto the bill. I seriously doubt a landlord would terminate a club lease because the club had LGBT bridge players. On the other hand, if the landlord perceives organized bridge as engaged in a lobbying effort it opposes, that's a whole different story (and likely a freedom of speech issue, from the landlord's perspective).
April 11, 2016
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I guess you are reminding us that this isn't a chess discussion. :)
April 11, 2016
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Please report her. It's very unlikely you're her only victim…
April 11, 2016
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I think everyone should calm down about this, or I'll have to wonder which will happen first to bridge clubs in Mississippi that rent space in certain places (like, say, certain houses of worship): Will their landlord terminate their lease, or will the ACBL terminate their sanction?

I don't think anyone objects to the idea of not holding Nationals in Mississippi, but the ordinary bridge players who happen to live in Mississippi should be able to continue enjoying bridge, whatever their political persuasions. After all, the ACBL's primary objective is to promote bridge and the interests of bridge players.
April 11, 2016
Christopher Monsour edited this comment April 11, 2016
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And I would hate to think that our esteemed leaders split an infinitive so flagrantly.
April 11, 2016
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I imagine psychs are rare in high-level tournament play because of professionalism, for the same reason that sensible but high risk strategies are uncommon in professional sports: If you make the normal play and it fails, the boss doesn't mind, but if you do something off-beat and it fails, the boss may be very annoyed. (For the Americans out there, yes, the analogy I have in mind is why 2-point conversions are not attempted more often in the NFL.)
April 11, 2016
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Among the British, I understand that if you have support, you don't have to worry that partner psyched. Oh, wait, that was jsut Reese and Shapiro…
April 11, 2016
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That depends…If someone psyched in balancing seat against a juicy penalty double by the opponents, then he is not to blame…
April 11, 2016
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Interesting, especially since those kinds of psychs are often very different from typical psychs. If you want to put the opponents off their game, pass a strong NT as dealer. (But, heavens, not in a short match.)

Another interesting gambit in a long match against very strong opposition is to take an obviously inferior (but only slightly inferior, like 50% vs 55%) line of play early in the match, to make them think you don't know what you're doing.
April 11, 2016
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There actually is a way to have a much better than 50% chance of success at psychs legally, if you are a good poker player. Read LHO's body language and don't ever psych unless he obviously has a big hand.
April 11, 2016
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@Frances I can accept that “psyche” is a perfectly acceptable alternate spelling for “psych”. I cannot accept that “psyche” can be a monosyllable when it means ψυχή. That's just barbaric.
April 11, 2016
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@Mark On the contrary, declarer is looking at different cards from the defender, so he is NOT always just as likely to understand when falsecarding makes sense. And it's very dicey since most bridge leagues disallow encrypted signals, but all bridge books tell you to falsecard freely when partner is broke, information (an encryption key, in technical terms) to which you are often privy when declarer is not.

There's actually a more slippery slope from falsecarding to encrypted signals than from psyching to concealed agreements.
April 11, 2016
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I think Yehudit meant that since the example she gave would not bid Drury but might jump to 3 or 4, a maximum pass of similar shape should start with Drury (because of the potential slam interest) and then reraise 2 (because of continues game interest).
April 11, 2016
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That seems space-consuming in the event opener has some other hand-type. It does remind me, though, that 15 years ago, just as transfer responses to 1 were becoming popular, some folks also swapped the 1 and 1 responses to 1. I never see this any more. Any thoughts on that particular convention, which doesn't add bidding room in aggregate, but does allow opener to declare more often?
April 11, 2016
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I am quite certain it arises more often in card play, but is just missed.
April 11, 2016
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Hey Rolf, who's off topic now? ROTFL
April 10, 2016
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Additionally I suppose the combination of A, short diamonds, and the Q (which may turn into a trump stopper allowing you to retain third-round control of diamonds for a short time) make a fast discard particularly unlikely, in addition to reducing the odds of a club honor in partner's hand.
April 10, 2016
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Just to clarify, in referencing “Avoid the Danger” I was intending to refer to the subsequent discussion about balancing of the dangers of the lead-directing double against making further asks to reduce defenders' inferences about the closed hand.

I was unsure how to create a link to a specific comment within that thread.
April 10, 2016
Christopher Monsour edited this comment April 10, 2016
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I agree with the last paragraph and would point out that there is generally more of such poor conduct from the opponents of the psychers (including gloating when the psych does not work) than from the psychers themselves.
April 10, 2016
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