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All comments by Christopher Monsour
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Among some folks I used to play with, there was a proverb to solve guesses as declarer: “Men underlead king; women underlead jack”.

Or does this belong in the thread on sexism in bridge?
June 29, 2016
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Never mind…I'd had to have discarded two clubs from hand. I shouldn't post lines of play when I'm tired…
June 29, 2016
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David, I'll agree Wilson was certainly no worse than Trump in the context of his times, but he was a lot worse than Trump in the context of the rest of his resume. One doesn't expect a Princeton man who pushed for national self-determination and the League of Nations to be fomenting ridiculously racist origin stories about his own nation. Trump, well, what do you expect from a real estate developer who starred in an extraordinarily rude reality TV show for years? I also still think Trump will never become president, and the French will be able to start making jokes about the Brits rather than the Americans.
June 28, 2016
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Agreed.

It's also a big problem when people who play bridge for a living get favoritism over those who don't.
June 28, 2016
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I didn't mean there was a squeeze on this lie of the cards, but of course I somehow missed the 10. If they shift to a club I win and play back another club to make 3 for sure.
June 28, 2016
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That's a good point. At IMPs you can certainly afford to give up that tempo as it never costs the setting trick. And you can also duck a club return to set up a squeeze, if one exists.
June 28, 2016
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Paul, clearly something like “best director ever” is a subjective assessment, and cases can clearly also be made for, among others, Hitchcock, Renoir, or Kurosawa. Great artists sometimes produce art in the service of evil political institutions; it doesn't mean they aren't great artists. (Consider Shostakovich or Khachaturian or, a while further back, but with reverberations felt this past week, Beethoven.)
June 28, 2016
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OK, it's obvious why the average woman might find a beggar more threatening than the average man might. Ergo, I shouldn't give the local panhandler any money because he's sexist.

Riiiight…
June 27, 2016
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On the other hand, when women write columns in which they rail against conventions around things like door-holding, why do you find it hard to believe that some men have actually met such women in person?
June 27, 2016
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Larry made the critical point–we understand about 10% of this stuff. To make matters even more confusing, most people think about this as nature vs nurture, but it's more than that. It's also cultural. And I don't mean things like certain genders being discouraged from certain professions (that's nurture) but things like “what do we mean by ‘spatial reasoning’?” Or by ‘intuition’?
June 27, 2016
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David, in the context of his times, Wilson was a far worse racist than Washington.
June 27, 2016
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For the record, since I seem to have caused a lot of discussion about “you should smile more”, I certainly did not mean that the comment is always appropriate. Sometimes it is and sometimes it isn't, and that largely depends on how it's meant and how it's said. I only meant to convey that complaining to men that “no one would ever say X to a man” or “no one would ever do Y to a man” about things that in fact do also happen to men in the ordinary course of events, is a very effective way to lose credibility with your intended audience.
June 27, 2016
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Oren, let me explain the distinction that I perceive between “content warnings” and “trigger warnings”. “Content warnings” warn that something, usually intended for enjoyment rather than instruction, may not be appropriate for a particular use (e.g., viewing by children, sharing with friends who are offended by foul lyrics, etc.). “Trigger warnings” seem to be used to give people a way of avoiding things that are appropriate–necessary even perhaps–but uncomfortable. Are we really going to put trigger warnings on (or on sections of) cultural (and scientific) monuments like the Bible? Homer? Vergil? Horace? Livy? Chaucer? Mallory? Machiavelli? Marlowe? Shakespeare? Or more recently the writings of the Grimms? Smith? Marx? Rosetti? Darwin? Galton? Pound? Stoppard? Doesn't that amount to cultural censorship and scientific censorship? (And, in the case of some of them, spoiling the plot?) Should students really be able, in a class that would otherwise require it, to opt out of reading about, learning about, and discussing Atreus and Thyestes? Agamemnon and Clytemnestra? Tarquin? Lars and Scaevola? Appius Claudius? Mithridates? Lot and his daughters? Herod and Salome and John the Baptist? David and Bathsheba and Uriah? Muhammad and Aisha? Faust and Mephistopheles? Barabas? Finches in the Galapagos? Eugenics? Global warming?

Do Aesop's fables now come with trigger warnings?

Would you suggest that the evolution chapter in high school biology textbooks in the US come with a trigger warning? If so, aren't you perpetuating superstition? If not, why are trigger warnings appropriate in other contexts?

I would maintain that once an appropriate curriculum is determined, it shouldn't be easy for individual students to avoid it.
June 27, 2016
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Of course, part of the problem with etiquette is that many people don't even know it, so they aren't so much offended as dumbfounded by it. For example, women (especially those from warmer climates) sometimes get miffed when I speed up to go through a revolving door first. But that's actually the proper etiquette, so that she doesn't have to start the door from a dead stop when she gets to it.
June 27, 2016
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Yes, that.
June 27, 2016
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David, You can call Wilson “progressive”, but he was a worse racist even than Trump.
June 27, 2016
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Saith Cornelia, “Generalizing by gender for attributes like these is exactly what the sexist men do.”

But for someone who says that, your post has a lot of generalizations by gender. So, Cornelia, are you saying you are a sexist man? Or just a careless proofreader?
June 27, 2016
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It depends on the rest of the hand. If the auction was 1NT-3NT and your hand is otherwise very weak, it would make sense.
June 27, 2016
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One other consideration with passive leads vs 3NT is that you need to consider who is declaring. Passive leads are much less effective against the very best players, who will read the hand well and extort damaging discards from you. Against Hamman, most mortals should try to set up a suit ASAP. Against mediocre players, passive leads have much more upside.

For example, an attacking lead away from the queen may solve a two-way guess for declarer. If declarer was 70% to get that finesse right anyway, that's substantially less cost than if it had been a coin flip.
June 26, 2016
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Max, are you sure you want to go there? What if the answer to “what will offend reasonable people?” turns out to be “bridge players”?
June 26, 2016
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