Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Brian Callaghan
1 2 3 4 5 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I was part of your team, Richard. Don't remember who my partner was, though.
May 25
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Some glitch caused this problem to be duplicated. I've given my action and comments in the other version.
May 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks everybody. I posed this problem to see if anyone found my at-the-table action. No one did (over the two instances of the problem that appeared by some glitch).

The immediate 4 bidders outvoted those who went slowly in an attempt to show values. I was in the go-slow camp and considered 3, but thought it might give LHO an easy double. I thought 4 (no one voted for this) might be interpreted as shortage. (I play mixed raises, but it's not obvious that 4 fits the definition.) That left 3NT on the general principle that jumping to 3NT, when known to lack the values, shows a suit fit.

Possible drawbacks to my action are that I might not be known to lack the values, and that the principle might not be as general as I assumed. In the event both opponents passed while partner looked confused and passed too. Partner said afterwards that we had never discussed this (true).

Partner had J1076 AKJ65 75 85.
LHO had 542 Q8 A6 KQ9742.
RHO had KQ83 10 KQ842 J63.

3NT was down two on a club lead, not terrible as 4 was not making either. (I think only a spade lead to an honour lets 3NT make.) If partner finds a spade against LHO's 4, that will defeat the contract, so stopping in 3 would have been best.
May 12
Brian Callaghan edited this comment May 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks. Although something of a systems person myself, even I have touble staying awake through reams of bidding description. So I wrote the article as an entertainment-come-origin myth.

I play these methods, even in serious competition, but they first grew out of an interest in seeing whether a non-Stayman method could be competitive. I've subsequently come up with a rationale that gets you there given a few guiding principles. Maybe I'll try and lay the thinking out in another article when I have time.
March 14
Brian Callaghan edited this comment March 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If “convention” is to mean something then why not have it refer to a collection of calls at least one of which is not both natural and non-forcing?
Feb. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I imagine that “face value” and “strictly logical” are in accord with the Morehead definition of a natural bid—one that may become the contract and therefore non-forcing.

What players may refer to as natural differs in bridge jurisdictions (it's certainly not the same for ACBL and EBU). Referring to some forcing bid as natural instead of the more accurate (but unwieldy) strain-natural disguises its cryptic nature (it is not level-natural).
Feb. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Late to the party. My feelings about what a convention is were probably formed when young. I located and opened my copy of Conventions Made Clear by Ben Cohen and Rhoda Barrow for the first time in over thirty years. (This slim volume was first published in 1966.)

The preface begins “What is a convention? In the bidding, it is a call which is understood by the partners not to be taken at face value. In other words, it is a call which has a definite meaning other than the strictly logical or obviously undertood one.”

That says that a convention is a single call, but the book is inconsistent. For example, under the heading “The Gladiator Convention” there is the phrase “Both 2 and 2 are used as conventional responses to 1NT.” So a convention may be a collection of calls, which is the way I understand the term.
Feb. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
That is the downside. The main upside is that the bidding may be at 2NT or 3NT at your next chance.
May 12, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Depends on what you think the spade bidder should do next (if anything), but at least the 2NT bidders are in with a chance.
May 8, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Six solid spades, three small hearts, and two small in each minor. The 3NT bidders would have hit the jackpot.
May 8, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks, everyone, for voting. The moral of deals like this one, where the auction takes an unusual turn, is probably to try to set out clear partnership guidelines on what delayed bids/doubles show. (The commenters, in the main, are acting, while the majority vote is for pass.)
May 7, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
2 shows a major one-suiter. 3 of a minor shows that minor.
May 1, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I play it similar to the way Frances does. It shows a minimum, so it's not a slam try at all, just leaving room for responder to investigate if still interested (referred to in my notes as “milk train” because it comes first instead of last).
April 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You never have to agree to disagree.
March 24, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well done!
March 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well done!
March 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When I first started in my local duplicate there was a partnership of two elderly men which neatly sidestepped the problem.

“I double one heart” was penalties; “double” was takeout.
Jan. 30, 2018
Brian Callaghan edited this comment Jan. 30, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
System on looks like an OK agreement. It’s not a cure‑all that you can apply to every auction, though. I remember bidding 1NT (without agreement as to its meaning) in an auction that started with the same two bids. Partner gave it mature consideration before passing.
Jan. 27, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The opponents’ convention card gives one‑level responses to 1 as: 1= 4+ hearts; 1=4+ spades; 1=no major 6–9 HCP, some other 10+ HCP, or 5 diamonds GF; 1NT=10–12 HCP.

NS have at least a seven‑card heart fit. Opener would have rebid 1NT 11–14 HCP with fewer than three hearts.
Jan. 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
That would have been a useful method for this particular hand, but the partnership agreement when the deal came up was that double would just show a diamond suit.
Jan. 16, 2018
1 2 3 4 5 6
.

Bottom Home Top