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All comments by Boye Brogeland
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I think we start in the wrong direction when we look for cheating: What are they doing? What are they signaling methods? Bridge is such a logic game (ecspecially for the top players) that it is much better to ask which information do they need to have (or would it be likely that they had) for making non-logical decisions. Then you can move back and try to find out how they get this exact information across.
Aug. 24, 2015
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Peter makes some valid points, but in my view it is also of utterly importance that each federation takes action. If we all join forces we will change the game back to what it was supposed to be. Or do we lact courage to fight for the game that we love?
Aug. 24, 2015
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Relax, it's coming.
Aug. 24, 2015
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I like to give people a chance to do the right thing, and I like to get it right myself.
Aug. 24, 2015
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Dear Hanan. If you or someone you know have a connection with the Israeli Federation, contact them and ask them to do the right thing. What is coming is huge, and history will judge the ones that didn't take action. For the most beautiful game in the world. Boye.
Aug. 24, 2015
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It will come out in due course. Hopefully the ACBL, the EBL and the WBF will take immediate actions so that the World Championships in Chennai in September/October will be a clean game. Wouldn't that be wonderful?
Aug. 23, 2015
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I guess quite a few would be interested after this intro. I hope that the ACBL, the EBL and the WBF will step up immediately so we can fix a lot of the things that have gotten lost over the years. We have to put the interest of the game on top of the agenda - not the interest of the few.
Aug. 22, 2015
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I have sent the information to many bridge players and journalists around the world, so the story won't die anyway. It's for all of us - also the ACBL, EBL and WBF - to do the right thing. For the game we love.
Aug. 22, 2015
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If the ACBL or EBL don't want to do it themselves, I can do it here on Bridgewinners. Probably a better way of presenting The Whole Spingold Story.
Aug. 22, 2015
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The Scandal in Buenos Aires (Reese-Schapiro) is peanuts compared to what's coming out.
Aug. 22, 2015
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It's from the Spingold.
Aug. 22, 2015
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Let's be real. This is probably just the top of the iceberg in bridge. What really happened in the Mike Passell case I don't know. With all the support he has received here there is no doubt in my mind that he's a jolly good fellow. The “facts” in this case, though, do not seem that flattering for him.

What I am going to write now I would ask you to take some seconds or minutes to think about. Very soon there will come out mind boggling stuff that would even make a Hollywood movie surreal. It will give us a tremendous momentum to clean the game up, from the bottom to the very top. But it will take courage and it will demand standing up against the powers of the game, if it's being the ACBL, the EBL, or the WBF. But don't ever think it's difficult. It's not. It's all about following your heart and doing what's right.

To the Bridgewinners people: Never back down for keeping this thread public.

To the rest: Go out, fight the good fight and get things done. Not in year, not in days, not in hours, but now.

For the future of our beautiful game.
Aug. 22, 2015
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It's not difficult: Play with integrity and stand up for the spirit of the game. Why change the most beautiful thing in the world?
Aug. 20, 2015
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Dear Mike, your friends and family. I have played against you many times; lost a few and won a few. I have never seen anything else than good sportmanship and a tough competitor. What you have done for American Bridge seems to be great, and more of us should spend time on serving for the game we love so much.

But I think we have to pay for stupidity also in bridge to keep the game as clean and pure as it can be. Let's say that Lance Armstrong was only found to have doped himself once (and even if he didn't needed to as he was winning the race by a lot anyway), or that he was plain stupid and took a short cut through the woods one day to save a minute or two. Shouldn`t he have to pay for this the same way other cyclists would have to even if he did a fantastic thing with Live Strong and helping cancer research? Nobody is above the law.

Here's another thing that I think is important for our game (might not belong in this thread, but I thought it wouldn't hurt to mention): When I was young I would peek in my opponents card if they turned it a little bit too much to my side. Today I would turn around as quickly as possible and ask my opponent to keep his card closer to the chest. If a card unintentionally drops to the table I would let my opponnent pick it up if I think he would do the same to me in a similar situation.

In our (Schwartz Team) Spingold Quarter Final against the Cayne Team Lorenzo Lauria pulled out the queen of spades against 5 clubs doubled (board 45) and moved it slowly towards the table. Half way there he realised it was the wrong card to play as he might drop partner's stiff jack. He put it back and changed it with a small spade. Alfredo Versace had the stiff jack and the contract made 11 tricks instead of 12 tricks. Of course we could have called the TD and asked for a ruling (I guess the queen of spade was a played card), but it's not the way we want to win. It's neither the spirit nor the future of our beautiful game.
Aug. 19, 2015
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As I need a few hours sleep before playing in a local tournamanet tomorrow, this might be my last post from the well. Many thanks for contributing with comments and questions. I enjoyed it.
Aug. 15, 2014
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Hi David, and many thanks for your interesting post. I hope you can cope with my long answer.

Discussing hands after play is a great way to improve your bridge thinking. I find that almost every hand has interesting aspects, which could easily be overlooked during play.

I was fortunate to partner the best player in the local club from the age of 14 to 19. He taught me lots of stuff on bidding and card play, but what I found most valuable was the time we spent in his Ford Escort every Thursday night going through all the interesting hands from the club evening. From the start I was amazed how he could remember it all, but it didn't take me long to be able to run through most of the hands and discuss what we could have done better. And he was always a master at mentioning all the good things I had done during the evening.

After I had moved to Bergen to start my studies, Tuesdays and Thursdays soon became bridge nights. I got to play with and against some of the best players in Norway, and afterwards we went out to discuss the hands. This made me pick up new ideas and raised my game.

Playing for Norway we had team dinners each and every day going through every single board that was played. Well, I guess it was mainly Helness and myself who dissected every card that was played to find out how we should have gotten a few extra IMPs. What a boring dinner some might say, but I feeded on it.

I also learnt a lot from playing with Tony Forrester and Ishmael Del'Monte on the Rita Shugart team from 2001 to 2007. They are both terrific players, with certain parts of their game being top notch. The last few years I have enjoyed both playing and discussing bridge with Zia, my bridge idol ever since I read his Bols tip “Roll over Houdini”. I have stolen quite a few of his ideas and methods.

To realise that 7 clubs on a 4-2 fit could be better than 7 spades on a 5-4 fit you got to visualize the whole hand and play it out in your mind before bidding it! I feel strongly about this approach to slam bidding: Try to figure out the likely hand partner has, play it out in your mind to see how many tricks you would normally make, and then take the appropriate bidding action. This is an area in which I think Espen Lindqvist and I are far better today than in 2008 when we won the European championships (and missed that 7 clubs in the last match).

And if clubs break 5-2 and you go down in 7 clubs to lose the European Championships, keep smiling. You took the right bridge action* - and definetely the most sexy one. At the end of the day that's all you can do.

*BBO commentators (but hopefully not your partner or team mates) might say you took the wrong bridge action because 62 % for 4-3 club break minus the chance of a spade ruff isn't a good grand slam. Looking at all four hands they forget that when you made the decision to bid 7 clubs you had the upside of partner having three (or even four) clubs. In that case the grand is huge.
Aug. 15, 2014
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Hi again. Back in the well for a few minutes to answer the final questions. The Precious incident happened quite a few years ago and I just vaguely remember it. Since it seems to have made a bigger impression on Steve, he is probably the guy to satisfy your curiosity.
Aug. 15, 2014
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I would do it if it feels right accoriding to the bid. With KJ10 it would be obvious in my view. My most creative lead directing double until now is doubling a transfer to spades with Ax of hearts - to get the ruff (and declarer may have a hard time figuring out the layout).
Aug. 15, 2014
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Jim: You got it. Well played. West: x-K9xxx-J10-AK9xx and East: xxxx-J10-Kxxxx-Jx.

Dean: You copied the play at the other table and made the normal guess.

Steve: I think I remember where Precious came from. The book goes to Jim Munday.

JoAnna: Thanks. I enjoyed being in the well and receiving lots of interesting questions and nice comments. Thanks again to all.

Mikael: Thanks a lot for your support and nice words. I hope to come to Copenhagen and would be happy to pair up again, but I am not sure if all the 16 spots are taken. It's a great tournament.
Aug. 15, 2014
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