Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Barry Rogoff
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 56 57 58 59
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ron, that's quite different from the point-showing-only steps I was referring to.
Oct. 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If the choice of which minor to open signifies anything other than the usual 1 with 3-3 or 1 with 4-4 (lopsided suits notwithstanding), how can it not be alertable?
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The meaning of 16B is clear enough. The problem isn't misinterpretation. It's in applying purely objective logic to it. Most of the disagreements in BW are the result of people applying subjective attitudes toward it without working through the logic.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It's those who can't be bothered to learn the rules and those who try to sleaze their way around them who ruin the game. There are a LOT more of those than bridge table lawyers.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I've heard of many accident-prone agreements but that one takes the cake.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Good point. I forgot to mention that I'd talk to the players against whom the psyche was made.

Even though a club director can set the “house rules” it makes no sense to ban psyches outright. Allowing frequent psyches, however, is a good way to make sure some of your regulars leave and never come back.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“I'm waiting for partner to describe her reason for opening 2.”

I love it when my opponents choose to waste a bid waiting when they could be giving opener useful information, particularly at IMPs.

“In all of my years of playing, I do not recall ever achieving a poor score vs. a pair that plays point-count steps as the response to 2.”

Same here. It's sad that some players never learn anything other than counting points. You can hear them asking each other “how many points did you have” over and over.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
13 -15 with relatively soft values and no four-card major unless 4333.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“How much information – how many rounds of disaster – do I need to allow to ensure that it's only bridge information that's being used?”

Read Law 16B. If everyone read and understood 16B, bridge would be a much more enjoyable game.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Trying to justify this sequence for anyone other than a pair of novices is nonsense. If I were the club director or manager, I'd notify the pair that all psyches in my club are recorded and that frequent psyches will result in the players being asked not to return. If I were a TD, I'd encourage the other pair to submit a recorder memo.

Before I took 20 years away from bridge to raise a family, psyches were still quite frequent. R-S and K-S controlled psyches were illegal but people thought nothing of opening a three-count in third seat or bidding 1M on a small doubleton after 1m-X. I don't think I've seen one of those since I started playing again about four years ago.

The salient point here is that no matter how good a result you get from psyching in a club game, it's not worth the animosity it creates. There's a game in my area that used to had a director back in the ‘80s who allowed anything and everything for fear of losing players. There was a player who psyched so often he was given the nickname “Joe Psyche.” Expert players used illegal conventions such as undefined one- and two-suited openings “for practice.”

The last time I psyched at a club game was at that club. My partner opened 3 white on red against some weak players and I had a 4333 two-count. I bid 3NT of course and it went all pass. When the opponents figured out what had happened, they were more than furious. I didn’t have time to explain the difference between psyching and cheating to them and they were gone before I finished the last board.
Oct. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The original post didn't say anything about BWS being played by either side. Assuming you have no idea what methods are in use, there's no way to know the strength and/or shape of a hand that opener would have for a free 2 reverse. Thus responder can't eliminate that hand from whatever the other possible calls may be intended to show.

How would you handle a very strong black two-suiter that you opened 1 because you don't like opening 2 with two-suiters. There are two cue bids available here in addition to 2NT and double. Unless the partnership has discussed this sort of situation and knows whether or not 2 is forcing, this is all just a guessing game.
Oct. 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
2 at this point would be a reverse with at least four spades and longer clubs so it matters whether or not it would be forcing for a round in competition. It also matters whether or not 2 is forcing and/or artificial. Some people play transfers in this situation.
Oct. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Whether or not to open 2 with a strong two-suiter deserves a thread of its own and has little bearing on how to define a 2 response to 2 other than the fact that step responses to show points or controls may prove to be costly because they can force opener to introduce the longer or higher-ranking suit on the three-level with little or no value in return.

In any case, I agree with the strategy of opening one of a suit and making a jump shift or reverse regardless of whether or not the hand is strong enough to open 2. (Presumably you're using the term reverse to include jump shifts.) It's less likely to get passed out than other shapes and in these days of hyperactive interference, it's important to get one of your suits in before the bidding gets too high to introduce the second suit.
Oct. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“…the inherent self-preemption of an artificial 2-level start for describing a strong hand–inevitably bites us in the backside on certain deals.”

It certainly does. That's a large part of the reason why defining 2 as a game force is too unilateral for my taste. I much prefer to have responder participate in the game vs. no game decision, even if it requires a lockstep to do so.

I think of 2 positive showing at least one control as a limited form of control-showing step responses. There's no reason why those have to be limited to slam decisions. There's often a huge difference between zero controls and one or two controls in responder's hand. 2 positive caters to the situations in which responder has enough to make a game but not enough to respond to a one-level opening bid, if that's defined as the traditional six high-card points. It also allows responder to make a natural bid with a good suit, which can be critical in finding a a fit, which typical control-showing step responses don't allow.

My partner and I recently had the following auction: 2-2-2-3-4 where 2 was a 1+ control game force and finding the 5-4 club fit allowed us to reach 6. It was the swing hand that won our bracket in a District 25 “Monster Knockout.” Opener didn't have to worry about responder passing 4 with a dead minimum and shortness in spades.

“The purpose of control showing responses to 2 is to determine whether the partnership has enough controls (10, usually) to make a slam.”

Ten controls is a useful guideline for avoiding bad slams when both hands are balanced but many slams require only eight or nine high-card controls when there are useful shortness controls. It's often shape opposite controls that produces a slam, not just controls.
Oct. 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It's not my notion. It's just something I noticed while studying Garozzo-Forquet hands to compare how they played the system to what's written in the books.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ed, having played Blue Team Club for many years, I appreciate the value of control responses as much as anyone. Shortly after I started playing it, I had an auction that went 1-1-7NT and I claimed before the dummy came down. But even with the extra space provided by starting with 1, responder (and rarely opener) still has to bid good four-card suits to avoid missing 4-4 fits and that problem is much more pronounced when starting with 2.

John, the value of 2 positive with at least one control is the low-level game force after 2-2-2M. It's much easier to explore the hand without having to worry about what's forcing and what's not. That assumes, of course, that opening 2 is not forcing to game, which allows for opening 2 with a major one-suiter and four losers.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't know what a mainstream 2 is but I certainly wouldn't define unbalanced hands in terms of high-card points. If I had to play control responses, the steps would be one, zero, two, three, etc. The subsequent bidding would be much like Blue Team Club in which responder can bid good four-card suits at his second turn.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, there was only one Blind Faith album but I still love it no matter how many hundreds of times I've played it. I have a few Cream and Blind Faith bootlegs but good ones are extremely hard to find. Sure, I liked the other groups too but Clapton's playing and Baker's solos never had quite the same raw intensity.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
No. “Born Under a Bad Sign” is a blues song played and recorded by Cream among others. Cream and Blind Faith defined a large part of my youth.
Oct. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Everyone has to decide where to draw the line. In a club game I let the opponents know whenever a bid means something other than what I think it would mean to Mama and Papa because they keep the game going.
Oct. 13
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 56 57 58 59
.

Bottom Home Top