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Spingold Chances QF- part 2
(Page of 2)

This is the second of several hand articles from the Spingold.

Before proceeding, let me reiterate my thanks to the ACBL, BBO, and most importantly Jan Martel.

As stated earlier, Jan's tireless efforts on all of our behalf make the setup, selection and Vugraph broadcasts truly World Class.

I hope all will find these hands enjoyable.

The following deal is from the third segment of the Meltzer-Gautret quarter-final match.

Meltzer was down by 33 imps heading into this segment and upon conclusion of this board had brought the match back to even.  Unfortunately, they fell behind on the very next board and were never able to recover.

I am providing the East-West hands initially for those wishing to attempt this double dummy problem with the DQ lead by South.

West
A42
Q542
K3
KJ85
East
KJ10853
J10
A54
A7
W
N
E
S
 
3
X
P
4
P
4
P
5
P
5N
P
6
P
P
P

Now on to the analysis,

After avoiding an albeit difficult initial H lead by South that would have defeated 6S immediately, Declarer had an opportunity to make the slam by winning the opening lead of the diamond Q in dummy with the DK.

Declarer, IMHO, had the clues to deduce a reasonable and necessary lie of the cards and distribution to allow the contract to be made.

My thoughts were:

1. South does not hold AK of Hearts

2. South likely does not have a H or C singleton with one or more Spades.

3. South holds 6 or 7 Diamonds making a diamond ruff in dummy unlikely unless spades are 2-2 or that South holds 3 small.

4. South must hold the Club Q with some length, in fact Q fourth if (3.) above is not present.

5. and lastly, that South holds the Heart A or K.

If declarer does read the position correctly, a rare three suit guard squeeze on South without the count is present.

Declarer placing the Spade length with North also assumes the Spade Q is with the length and therefore needs to take a first round finesse for the SQ, preserving dummy’s SA for a subsequent dummy reentry to take a second finesse and thereby picking up the 4-0 trump break if in fact Spades do break in this manner.  This line also caters to (3.) when Spades do break 2-2 with the Spade Q with North.

In the actual layout, upon the lead of all six of declarer’s trumps, South has to eventually give up the twelfth trick as he can only hold 6 cards, but has to hold 7; Qxxx in Clubs, Jx in Diamonds, and the Heart A or K.

At the table, declarer initially cashed the Spade A and now lacks the dummy entries to pick up the trumps as well as preserve the Club threat and ended down one after taking the club finesse to pitch one Heart loser.

I found this to be the most interesting and challenging play problem of six days of Vugraph.

Please feel free to comment.

 

West
A42
Q542
K3
KJ85
North
Q976
A9873
9
1096
East
KJ10853
J10
A54
A7
South
K6
QJ108762
Q432
W
N
E
S
 
3
X
P
4
P
4
P
5
P
5N
P
6
P
P
P
D
6 East
NS: 0 EW: 0

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