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Quantitative invites
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Lets say you play a 15-17 strong NT (but the method is adaptable). I provide a very simple set of suggestions after the sequence 1N - 4N.

  • All bids are natural
  • Bids at the five-level show one ace (and willingness to accept the slam invite)
  • Bids at the six-level show two+ aces
  • (You give up on grand slam aspirations following a quantitative invite to six)

You pick up:

Example 1

South
A1096
AQ64
K10
K94
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
4NT
P
?

You bid 6NT as would everyone else.

Example 2

South
K109
AQJ64
K10
Q94
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
4NT
P
?

You bid 5 showing your source of tricks, but only one ace. Partner will place the contract (5NT is to play).

 

Tradeoffs

Well you are unlikely to reach quantitative slams off two aces. This may or may not be a good thing if you think your teammates are particularly inept at cashing two aces. (TIP: suit preference on Ace lead versus quantitative slams).

You may also reach the right strain more often (especially compared to those that show Ace-responses to a quantitative 4NT bid).

Few tempo problems.

Question 1

What if responder doesn't have any aces?

There's always Gerber. You need a fairly good hand missing all the aces to invite slam.

Question 2

What if responder has three (or more) aces?

Firstly, in any case, if partner has no aces, it's unlikely they will be accepting any try, although there are intermediate-rich hands you can construct. So you might try 4NT and bid over the hoped-for five-level response.

Alternatively, if sufficient high cards are all you're after, this treatment has positive synergy with a 2 range ask.

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