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More weirdness from the 1971 Bowl
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Richard Fleet has been kind enough to show us a deal from the 1971 Bermuda Bowl.

His article is here:

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/atb-grand-slam-fiasco-from-the-1971-bermuda-bowl/

I have three more deals from the 1971 BB.  Two have been published and are reasonably well-known; the other, perhaps less so.

I will present each deal as a quiz.  See how you go.

Question 1

South
J1065
AJ873
8
AK5
W
N
E
S
2
?

Your call.

This hand is described in Bob Hamman's Bridge at the Table.

The fact that Jaïs and Trézel were former world champions [BB 1956, Olympiad 1960, World Pairs 1962] was tainted by their reputation as cheats… Near the end of the round-robin, Don Krauss and Lew Mathe sat down to play against Jaïs and Trézel… Lew said to Jaïs, “It’s Don’s birthday today. Let’s keep it clean.” Nothing was said, but on the very first board, Jaïs held something like:

J 10 6 5 A J 8 7 3 8 A K 5

Mathe opened a weak 2 on his right and Jaïs passed! Well, guess what? Trézel’s high card holding consisted of a jack. Was it a lucky guess?

Question 2

West
J
94
985
AQ109832
W
N
E
S
P
1
3
X
5
6
P
P
P

Your lead.

Trezel
J
94
985
AQ109832
Jacoby
KQ63
863
J76
J64
Jais
98754
7
A1032
K75
Wolff
A102
AKQJ1052
KQ4
W
N
E
S
P
1
3
X
5
6
P
P
P
D
6 South
NS: 0 EW: 0

This hand is from the final and was shown on vugraph.

From Hamman's Inside the Bermuda Bowl:

As soon as the hands were flashed onto the screens, Pedro-Paul Assumpção - a very savvy player and a member of the Brazilian team that was out of the event - began taking bets.  

"I'll give you five-to-one," Pedro-Paul said, "that he leads a diamond."

[Hamman asserts that the singleton spade is a clear-cut choice]

 Well, Trézel led the 5, a wildly anti-percentage action... The vugraph audience and the commentators were struck dumb. Why did Trézel lead a diamond?  What was going on?

It was simple.  Trézel knew his partner had strength in diamonds...

South
Q107
AJ4
KQ643
K10
W
N
E
S
?

This hand is also from the final. 

You are playing a 15-18 NT

Your call.

 

Trezel
9432
762
952
543
Jais
Q107
AJ4
KQ643
K10
W
N
E
S
?

Jaïs opened 1, treating the hand as a canapé two-suiter.

That's right, 1, thereby greatly reducing the chance of a penalty.

In Hamman's words, was this a lucky guess?

 

Two Super Secret Bonus hands are on the next page!

A particular pair played a 13-15 NT in world championship finals.  Of the 22 hands they had suitable for this call, 20 were indeed opened with 1NT

Here are the other two hands.

North
1062
9832
10963
Q10
South
K97
K1064
QJ4
A85
W
N
E
S
P
P
?

 

North
1087
9874
109
10863
South
K965
KJ3
K864
AJ
W
N
E
S
?

Both hands were opened 1, each member of the partnership selecting this bid alternately.

The Official Handbook says, of this last choice, that he "chose an exceptionally good moment to decide not to open a 13-15 point notrump."

In Hamman's words, was this a lucky guess?

 

Extra-Special Bonus Jaïs - Trézel hand on the next page!

From the 1954 European Championships.

South
10974
62
K6
Q8753
W
N
E
S
?

Your call.

South
10974
62
K6
Q8753
W
N
E
S
?

Jaïs opened 1.

Partner Trézel had a Yarborough and five small hearts. The opponents were cold for three grand slams.

In Hamman's words, was this a lucky guess?

Boye Brogeland:

My approach to discover cheating by world class players is to look at non-obvious actions and the success rate of these… when players and pairs choose non-logical actions, which in addition have a great success rate (the actions are deemed as non-logical because you would expect them to have a lot worse success rate than 50 %), we should raise an eyebrow. The proof is in the pudding.

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