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Grand Slam missing the Ace of Trumps - ATB or just Bridge?
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I recall a hand from the fantastic book "Famous Bridge Disasters" quoted from an European Bridge Championship where several pairs bid to 7 missing the Ace of trumps (mind you, they had a 12 card fit), most of the time without any adverse intervention to complicate matters.

I am testing my memory, so it may not be 100% accurante, but the hand in question was something like 

North
KQJ10x
x
KQxxx
xx
South
Ax
Ax
J109xxxx
Ax
W
N
E
S
1
P
2
P
4
P
?

At at least one table South tried 4NT and discovered one key card missing, but could be the K, so made one more try for 7. North thinking all the key cards where there bid 7 based in the source of tricks from the spade suit.

If that can happen at top European level, then I thought it should not be particularly shameful that during last weekend local tournament in Madrid a similar fate occured.

This was the typical auction:

West
QJ10xxxxx
x
A
Jxx
North
x
Q109xxx
KQ10xxx
East
xx
KJ10xxxxx
x
xx
South
AKx
AQx
KJxxx
Ax
W
N
E
S
4
4NT
P
7
X
D

I polled the South hand (https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/bidding-problem-2-dbltide3ja/) and a vast majority opted for a direct leap to seven (maybe partly because I did not offer the option of sophisticated agreements on that situation).

I was West at the table and opponents argued about the outcome of the hand. If it seems fairly normal to bid 7 with South hand, should North have passed? Does not feel right to me when having a fit for either minor would make game or slam cold or at worst a save against the enemy game. True that South can invite, but still should South expect North to accept with something like AQxxx KQTxx?

At the table it is not easy to keep a cool head after a hand like this (BTW, the hand was a push in our match!), and it seems natural to start assigning the blame.

For me, it was just reasonable bridge with an unfortunate result for NS.

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