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Avon Wilsmore and Eugenio Chiaradia
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In his "speech", Avon Wilsmore tells us quite convincingly that the Blue Team cheated. I tend to believe his theory, since he has done extensive research and I have not.

But I do have a problem with his assertion that while Garozzo, Belladonna and to a certain degree Forquet were outstanding players, the others, in particular Eugenio Chiaradia,  were not.

 

I present to you four hands played by Chiaradia in major events, and you can decide for yourself if we are talking about a weak or even an average player. The source for these hands is an article by Christoph Pürstl in the January 2017 edition of "Bridge", an Austrian publication.

West
642
QJ10
K7654
43
North
QJ7
A943
932
865
East
103
7652
J108
AJ97
South
AK985
K8
AQ
KQ102
W
N
E
S
 
2
P
2
P
2
P
3
P
4
P
4
P
5
P
5
P
6
?
D

This hand is from the 1957 Bermuda Bowl in New York. The bidding seems weird to me, but it sure doesn't look like Chiaradia knew d'Alelio's hand!

 

Chiaradia won the Q lead in hand, played 9(!) to the Queen, a Club to his King, and crossed with the 8 to dummy's Jack, dropping East's 10. He now played another Club from dummy, East won the Ace and could have defeated the contract by giving his partner a ruff. However he shifted to a . Chiaradia rose with the Ace, crossed to dummy's 7, played a to the 10, and another top , followed by the A and K.  This last card squeezed West in the red suits.

West
J5
J32
10963
A932
North
K72
Q54
A54
J654
East
AQ10986
Q872
Q108
South
43
AK109876
KJ
K7
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
P
1NT
2
3
P
4
?
D

 

This amazing hand is from the 1959 European Championship in Palermo.The defense began with three sounds of Spades. Chiaradia ruffed high, cashed his other top , and finessed West out of his J, leaving the following situation with the lead in dummy:

North
A54
J654
South
987
KJ
K7

 

Based on the bidding, a Club to the K seemed doomed to fail, while a winning finesse seemed pointless considering the lack of a re-entry to dummy. However, Eugenio played a to the Jack, followed by the remaining trumps, which led to this situation:

West
109
A9
North
A5
J6
East
Q8
Q10
South
7
K
K7
D

 

On the last heart, West was forced to part with a . Eugenio pitched a and East had to throw a club, lest Eugenio overtake the K. Now Chiaradia cashed the K and exited with his small club. Whoever won this trick had to give declarer the last trick!

West
KJ9875
KJ7
982
3
North
A2
Q43
764
K7654
East
1064
10985
53
QJ102
South
Q3
A62
AKQJ10
A98
W
N
E
S
 
1
1
2
P
2
P
2N
P
3
P
3
P
4
P
4
P
4
P
5
P
P
?
D

 

On this hand from the same event, Chiaradia sat West and Forquet East. Eugenio led his singleton , won in hand and followed by three rounds of trump. Declarer knew it would be futile to duck a to East now, since the obvious return would remove one of the two entries needed to set up the suit and enjoy the pitch on the fifth Club. Instead, declarer at both tables tried the effect of a small Heart at trick 5. Against Avarelli, West took his King and returned a Heart, and now Avarelli had no difficulty. But Chiaradia followed with the J (!) and when declarer continued with Ace and another, Chiaradia threw his King, allowing Forquet to win the third round and switch to a spade through the Queen.

North
QJ8
AK5
K65
AQ107
South
642
AJ109872
K65

This hand is written up in a Daily Bulletin at the 1995 European Championships, but the hand itself is from an unknown prior event. Siniscalco in North opened 1, East overcalled 1, and Chiaradia drove the bidding to 7

West led the 10, covered by the Queen, King and ruffed. Eugenio continued with the A. East showed out, and in fact pitched Spades on all three rounds of trump. Chiaradia continued with A, and a to his King, leaving:

North
J8
AK5
Q9
South
642
987
6

Chiaradia was quite sure West held the 9, based on the opening lead, He considered playing two rounds of hearts, followed by by the J, to transfer the Spade threat to West. Then on the run of the trumps West would have been pop-up squeezed in the black suits.

In fact this plan would not have worked, since it was East who held the four-card club length. Instead, Eugenio cashed the Q and ruffed dummy's last club, leaving:

West
93
1097
North
J8
AK5
East
A7
QJ8
South
642
98
D

On the 9, West had to throw a Heart, as did dummy. and now East was trump-squeezed in the majors.

 

Assuming these hands are properly credited to Chiaradia, I would say the man could play bridge.

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